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Do Women Need Women Representatives?

Abstract

This article analyses the relationship between the representatives and the represented by comparing elite and mass attitudes to gender equality and women’s representation in Britain. In so doing, the authors take up arguments in the recent theoretical literature on representation that question the value of empirical research of Pitkin’s distinction between substantive and descriptive representation. They argue that if men and women have different attitudes at the mass level, which are reproduced amongst political elites, then the numerical under-representation of women may have negative implications for women’s substantive representation. The analysis is conducted on the British Election Study (BES) and the British Representation Study (BRS) series.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Phillips , The Politics of Presence

Lovenduski , Feminizing Politics

Converse , ‘The Nature of Belief Systems in Mass Publics’

Bernadette Hayes , ‘Gender, Feminism and Electoral Behaviour in Britain’; Electoral Studies, 16 (1997), 203216

Warren Miller and Donald Stokes , ‘Constituency Influence in Congress’, American Political Science Review, 57 (1963), 4556

Converse , ‘The Nature of Belief Systems in Mass Publics’

Norman Nie and Kristi Andersen , ‘Mass Belief Systems Revisited’, Journal of Politics, 36 (1974), 540591

Fleishman , ‘Attitude Organisation in the General Public’; Zaller, The Nature and Origins of Mass Opinion

Dovi , ‘Preferable Descriptive Representatives’

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British Journal of Political Science
  • ISSN: 0007-1234
  • EISSN: 1469-2112
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-political-science
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