Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-r8t2r Total loading time: 0.222 Render date: 2022-07-06T13:04:56.530Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Interplant movement of apterous aphids with special reference to Myzus persicae (Sulz.) (Hem., Aphididae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 July 2009

P. Ferrar
Affiliation:
School of Agriculture, Cambridge, U.K.

Extract

It is likely that under some conditions apterous aphids are significantly involved in the spread of plant viruses, most importantly by walking across soil from plant to plant. Various factors which affect their importance are considered in the paper.

Figures are given for the frequency of movement of apterae of Myzus persicae (Sulz.) under settled conditions; this was found to vary with the species of host-plant that the aphid was on.

Eourth-instar and adult apterae can walk proficiently on soil. The effect of soil condition on this is described. The walking speed of adult apterae on soil is 5.2 cm./min. at 18°C, and 1.2 cm./min. at 8.5°C. The walking speed of fourth-instar aphids on soil is 3.2 cm./min. at 18°C.

Experiments showed that walking aphids are well able to locate a new host-plant, and that the attraction is visual.

The significance of these observations is discussed, and it is concluded that apterae have a greater potential as virus vectors than has been generally realised.

Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1969

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Bald, J.G., Norris, D.O. & Helson, G.A. (1950). Transmission of potato virus diseases. VI. The distribution of the aphid vectors on sampled leaves and shoots.—Aust. J. agric. Res. 1 pp. 1832.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bjorling, K., Lihnell, D. & Ossiannilsson, F. (1951). Marking viruliferous aphids with radioactive phosphorus.—Acta Agric. scand. 1 pp. 301317.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Broadbent, L. (1960). Infectivity of aphids bred on virus-infected cauliflower plants.—Ann. Appl. Biol. 48 pp. 377383.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Broadbent, L. (1965). The importance of alate aphids in virus spread within crops.—Proc. 12th int. Congr. Ent. 1964 pp. 523524.Google Scholar
Czerwinski, H. (1943). Untersuchungen und Beobachtungen über die Blattlaus Myzodes persicae Sulz. als Verbreiter des Kartoffelabbaues auf dem Versuchsfeld des Instituts für Acker- und Pflanzenbau Berlin-Dahlem und dem Versuchsgut Thyrow.—Angew. Bot. 25 pp. 201250.Google Scholar
Davidson, J. (1925). Biological studies of Aphis rumicis Linn. Factors affecting the infestation of Vicia faba with Aphis rumicis.—Ann. appl. Biol. 12 pp. 472507.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davies, W.M. (1932). Ecological studies on aphids infesting the potato crop.—Bull. ent. Res. 23 pp. 535548.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Doncaster, J.P. (1943). The life history of Aphis (Doralis) rhamni B.d.F. in eastern England.—Ann. appl. Biol. 30 pp. 101104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Doncaster, J.P. & Gregory, P.H. (1948). The spread of virus diseases in the potato crop.—A.R.C. Rep. Ser. no. 7, 189 pp.Google Scholar
Fisken, A.G. (1959). Factors affecting the spread of aphid-borne viruses in potato in eastern Scotland. II. Infestation of the potato crop by potato aphids, particularly Myzus persicae (Sulzer).—Ann. appl. Biol. 47 pp. 274286.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heathcote, G.D. (1955). The behaviour of aphids and its effect upon the spread of plant virus diseases.—M.Sc. thesis, Univ. London.Google Scholar
Hollings, M. (1958). The measurement of aphid activity in relation to the spread of potato viruses.—Proc. 3rd Conf. Potato Virus Dis. 1957 pp. 8590.Google Scholar
Hughes, R.D. (1963). Population dynamics of the cabbage aphid, Brevicoryne brassicae (L.).—J. Anim. Ecol. 32 pp. 393424.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Impens, R., Francois, E. & Riga, A. (1965). Les radioisotopes en écologie animale: I. Expériences sur le marquage de pucerons vecteurs de la jaunisse de la betterave.—Meded. Landb Hoogesch. OpzoekStns Gent 30 pp. 10091015.Google Scholar
Ito, Y. (1952). On the population increase and migration in three species of barley aphids. Studies on the mechanisms of ecological segregation in barley aphids. (1). [In Japanese with English summary] Oyo-Kontyu 7 pp. 169176.Google Scholar
Johnson, B. (1955). Studies on flight, host selection and reproduction in aphids.—Ph.D. thesis, Univ. Lond.Google Scholar
Joyce, R.J.V. (1938). On certain aspects of the feeding mechanism, feeding habits and ecology of the potato aphids, Myzus persicae (Sulz.) and Macrosiphum gei Koch, in relation to the dissemination of virus diseases of potato.—M.Sc. thesis, Univ. Wales (Bangor).Google Scholar
Kennedy, J.S., Ibbotson, A. & Booth, C.O. (1950). The distribution of aphid infestation in relation to leaf age. I. Myzús persicae (Sulz.) and Aphis fabae Scop. on spindle trees and sugar-beet plants.—Ann. appl. Biol. 37 pp. 651679.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Klostermeyer, E.C. (1953). Entomological aspects of the potato leaf roll problem in Central Washington.—Tech. Bull. Wash. agric. Exp. Stn. no. 9, 42 pp.Google Scholar
Ootake, A. (1954). The fluctuation of aphid population. [In Japanese with English summary].—Oyo-Kontyu. 10 pp. 2328.Google Scholar
Ossiannilsson, F. (1966). Insects in the epidemiology of plant viruses.—A. Rev. Ent. 11 pp. 213232.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ribbands, C.R. (1965). The significance of apterous aphids in the spread of viruses within agricultural crops.—Proc. 12th int. Congr. Ent. 1964 pp. 525526.Google Scholar
Shands, W.A & Simpson, G.W. (1959). Characteristics of aphid-population growth on potatoes in northeastern Maine.—Ann. ent. Soc. Am. 52 pp. 117121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wyatt, I.J. (1965). The distribution of Myzus persicae (Sulz.) on year-round chrysanthemums. I. Summer season.—Ann. appl. Biol. 56 pp. 439459.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Interplant movement of apterous aphids with special reference to Myzus persicae (Sulz.) (Hem., Aphididae)
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Interplant movement of apterous aphids with special reference to Myzus persicae (Sulz.) (Hem., Aphididae)
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Interplant movement of apterous aphids with special reference to Myzus persicae (Sulz.) (Hem., Aphididae)
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *