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Preselecting predatory mites for biological control: the use of an olfactometer

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 July 2009

A. Janssen
Affiliation:
Department of Population Biology, University of Leiden, The Netherlands and Department of Pure and Applied Ecology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
C.D. Hofker
Affiliation:
Department of Population Biology, University of Leiden, The Netherlands
A.R. Braun
Affiliation:
Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical, Cali, Colombia
N. Mesa
Affiliation:
Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical, Cali, Colombia
M.W. Sabelis
Affiliation:
Department of Pure and Applied Ecology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
A.C. Bellotti
Affiliation:
Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical, Cali, Colombia

Abstract

Previous investigations showed that (1) predatory mites use odours volatilizing from spider-mite infested plants for remote prey selection and (2) the response to the volatiles is correlated to the predator's ability to control populations of the prey species. Based on this correlation, it is hypothesized that preselecting predatory mites with the aid of olfactometer experiments will increase the probability of finding an efficient natural enemy. Y-tube olfactometer experiments with 11 species of phytoseiids showed that only four species were attracted by the odour of cassava leaves infested with cassava green mite Mononychellus tanajoa (Bondar). If the hypothesis mentioned above is valid, the probability of finding an efficient natural enemy within this group of four will be higher than finding one by randomly taking a species from the initial group of 11 species. Since testing of phytoseiids with an olfactometer can be done in a few hours, it is suggested that these tests precede more laborious evaluation methods.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1990

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References

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