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EFFECTS OF CONSTANT TEMPERATURE, RELATIVE HUMIDITY, AND SIMULATED RAINFALL ON DEVELOPMENT AND SURVIVAL OF THE SPRUCE SPIDER MITE (OLIGONYCHUS UNUNGUIS)1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

John V. Boyne
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh 27650
Fred P. Hain
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh 27650

Abstract

Experiments were conducted on Fraser fir, Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir, seedlings or cut terminals. Results indicate that Oligonychus ununguis (Jacobi) responds most favorably to temperatures approximating 26 °C and to relative humidity levels approaching 50 to 60%. Developmental time, time to 50% mortality, net reproductive rate, mean generation time, intrinsic rate of natural increase, finite rate of increase, and days for populations to double were computed for each temperature and relative humidity regime. Simulated rainfall severely limits population density on Fraser fir seedlings.

Résumé

Des expériences ont été réalisées sur des plantules et des pousses coupées de sapin fraser, Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir. Les résultats indiquent qu'Oligonychus ununguis (Jacobi) répond le plus favorablement à des températures autour de 26 °C et des niveaux d'humidité relative de 50 à 60%. Le temps de développement, le temps requis pour 50% de mortalité, le taux net de reproduction, le temps moyen de génération, le taux intrinsèque d'accroissement naturel, le taux d'accroissement par unité de temps, et le nombre de jours requis pour le dédoublement de la population, ont été calculés pour chaque régime de température et d'humidité. La pluie simulée limite sérieusement la densité de population sur les plantules de sapin Fraser.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1983

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EFFECTS OF CONSTANT TEMPERATURE, RELATIVE HUMIDITY, AND SIMULATED RAINFALL ON DEVELOPMENT AND SURVIVAL OF THE SPRUCE SPIDER MITE (OLIGONYCHUS UNUNGUIS)1
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EFFECTS OF CONSTANT TEMPERATURE, RELATIVE HUMIDITY, AND SIMULATED RAINFALL ON DEVELOPMENT AND SURVIVAL OF THE SPRUCE SPIDER MITE (OLIGONYCHUS UNUNGUIS)1
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EFFECTS OF CONSTANT TEMPERATURE, RELATIVE HUMIDITY, AND SIMULATED RAINFALL ON DEVELOPMENT AND SURVIVAL OF THE SPRUCE SPIDER MITE (OLIGONYCHUS UNUNGUIS)1
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