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EVALUATION OF THE TREE-BEATING METHOD FOR SAMPLING DEFOLIATING FOREST INSECTS

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

J. W. E. Harris
Affiliation:
Pacific Forest Research Centre, Canadian Forestry Service, Victoria, British Columbia
D. G. Collis
Affiliation:
Pacific Forest Research Centre, Canadian Forestry Service, Victoria, British Columbia
K. M. Magar
Affiliation:
Pacific Forest Research Centre, Canadian Forestry Service, Victoria, British Columbia

Abstract

A procedure for sampling defoliating forest insect larvae by beating them from foliage, used by the Forest Insect and Disease Survey of the Canadian Forestry Service to record population trends and predict future damage and control need in British Columbia, was tested over 150,000 acres on Vancouver Island. The parameters used were average numbers of larvae per collection and percentage positive collections. Results on the test species Acleris gloverana (Wlshm.) and Melanolophia imitata (Wlk.), on host Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg., indicated that for low (normal) population levels the present system of choosing three-tree samples along roadsides was satisfactory but that weather conditions markedly affected sample results.

Résumé

L’auteur éprouva une méthode d’échantillonnage de larves d’insectes defoliateurs qui existaient sur plus de 150,000 acres dans l’île de Vancouver, méthode qui consiste à battre le feuillage. Elle est couramment utilisée par des membres du Service canadien des forêts qui inventorient les insectes nuisibles et les maladies des arbres forestiers. Le nombre de larves ainsi obtenu permet d’évaluer les tendances de populations et les dommages à venir et les besoins de lutte. Les paramètres choisis sont le nombre moyen de larves récoltées a chaque opération, et le pourcentage d’opérations positives. Les insectes récoltes étaient Acleris gloverana (Wlshm.) et Melmolophia imiiaia (Wlk.), trouves sur Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg. Il ressort de l’étude que lorsque les populations sont basses (normales), la méthode de battage des échantillons de trois arbres sur le bord des routes s’avère satisfaisante, quoique les conditions atmosphériques influent beaucoup sur les résultats obtenus.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1972

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References

Bliss, C. I. 1967. Statistics in biology, I. McGraw-Hill, Toronto.Google Scholar
Davidson, A. G., Reeks, W. A., and Prentice, R. M.. 1967. Forest insect and disease surveys and research as an aid to the management of Canadian forests. Prepared for Nith Commonwealth Forest Conference, India, 1968. Dep. For. Rur. Dev., Ottawa. 11 p.Google Scholar
McGugan, B. M. 1958. The Canadian Forest Insect Survey. Proc. 10th int. Congr. Ent. (Montreal), Vol. 4, P. 219232.Google Scholar
Morris, R. F. 1955. The development of sampling techniques for forest insect defoliators, with particular reference to the spruce budworm. Can. J. Zool. 33: 225294.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Richmod, H. A. 1954. Forest insect surveys. Proc. ent. Soc. Br. Columb. 50: 2830.Google Scholar
Scheffé, H. 1959. The analysis of variance. Wiley. New York.Google Scholar
Siegel, S. 1956. Nonparametric statistics. McGraw-Hill, Toronto.Google Scholar
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