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Host Preferences of Drino bohemica Mesn. (Diptera: Tachinidae), with Particular Reference to Olfactory Responses1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

L. G. Monteith
Affiliation:
Entomology Laboratory, Belleville, Ontario

Extract

Many factors influence the host preferences of entomophagous insects and have an important role in determining the fate of parasites in the field. Some of the factors influence the ability of parasites to locate their hosts. Others determine the suitability of the host as a medium for larval development (7, 15, 18, 26, 27, 31). These factors together determine the range of hosts attacked and control the degree to which nonpreferred hosts are selected.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1955

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References

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Host Preferences of Drino bohemica Mesn. (Diptera: Tachinidae), with Particular Reference to Olfactory Responses1
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