Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-mjrxc Total loading time: 0.576 Render date: 2022-10-07T23:55:38.777Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Paraclemensia acerifoliella (Lepidoptera: Incurvariidae) in western Canada: a newly discovered host, an expanded range, and biogeographical considerations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 November 2014

Gregory R. Pohl*
Affiliation:
Natural Resources Canada, 5320 122 St., Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6H 3S5
Christi Jaeger
Affiliation:
Natural Resources Canada, 5320 122 St., Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6H 3S5 Mississippi State University, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Starkville, Mississippi 39762, United States of America
Vazrick Nazari
Affiliation:
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes, K.W. Neatby Bldg., 960 Carling Ave., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0C6
Chris Schmidt
Affiliation:
Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes, K.W. Neatby Bldg., 960 Carling Ave., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0C6
Danika Richard
Affiliation:
Natural Resources Canada, 5320 122 St., Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6H 3S5 Ecole Plamondon School, P.O. Box 90, 9814 100 St., Plamondon, Alberta, Canada T0A 2T0
Stan Gosche
Affiliation:
independent researcher; 9 Kings Gate, St. Albert, Alberta, Canada T8N 5M1
*
1Corresponding author (e-mail: gpohl@nrcan.gc.ca).

Abstract

The maple leafcutter moth (Paraclemensia acerifoliella (Fitch) (Lepidoptera: Incurvariidae) has been discovered in western Canada, feeding on saskatoon (Amelanchier alnifolia (Nuttall) Nuttall ex Roemer (Rosaceae)), a previously undocumented host. New records are detailed, and historical records are reviewed and assessed. Western populations are compared morphologically, genetically, and ecologically to populations feeding on maple (Acer Linnaeus; Sapindaceae) in eastern Canada. Paraclemensia Busck species host plants are discussed in relation to the hypothesised phylogenetic history of the genus. Although maple feeding is hypothesised to be the ancestral condition in the genus Paraclemensia, Rosaceae feeding (including Amelanchier) is hypothesised to be a derived capability of the P. acerifoliella species group.

Type
Biodiversity & Evolution
Copyright
© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service 2014 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

Subject editor: Staffan Lindgren

References

Bird, C.D., Hilchie, G.J., Kondla, N.G., Pike, E.M., and Sperling, F.A.H. 1995. Alberta butterflies. The Provincial Museum of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.Google Scholar
Bird, R.D. 1927. A preliminary ecological survey of the district surrounding the entomological station at Treesbank, Manitoba. Ecology, 8: 207220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brandt, J.P. 2009. The extent of the North American boreal zone. Environmental Reviews, 17: 101161.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Busck, A. 1904a. Tineid moths from British Columbia, with descriptions of new species. Proceedings of the United States National Museum, 27: 745778.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Busck, A. 1904b. A new name for a tineid genus. Journal of the New York Entomological Society, 12: 177.Google Scholar
Campbell, C., Campbell, I.D., Blyth, C.B., and McAndrews, J.H. 1994. Bison extirpation may have caused the aspen expansion in western Canada. Ecography, 17: 360362.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, D.R. 1974. A new species of Paraclemensia from Europe with comments on the distribution and speciation of the genus. Alexanor, 8: 342348.Google Scholar
DeVore, M.L. and Pigg, K.B. 2007. A brief review of the fossil history of the family Rosaceae with a focus on the Eocene Okanogan Highlands of eastern Washington State, USA, and British Columbia, Canada. Plant Systematics and Evolution, 266: 4557.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dyar, H.G. 1904. The Lepidoptera of the Kootenai district of British Columbia. Proceedings of the United States National Museum, 27: 779938.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Entomological Society of British Columbia (ESBC). 1906. Check list of British Columbia Lepidoptera. British Columbia Department of Agriculture, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.Google Scholar
Farrar, J.L. 1995. Trees in Canada. Co-published by Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada and Fitzhenry and Whiteside Limited, Markham, Ontario, Canada.Google Scholar
Fernández-Triana, J.L. 2010. Eight new species and an annotated checklist of Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) from Canada and Alaska. ZooKeys, 63: 153.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Forbes, W.T.M. 1923. The Lepidoptera of New York and neighboring states Part I. Primitive forms, Microlepidoptera, Pyraloids, Bombyces. Cornell University Agriculture Experimental Station Memoirs, 68: 1729.Google Scholar
Graham, A. 1964. Origin and evolution of the biota of southeastern North America: evidence from the fossil plant record. Evolution, 18: 571585.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hansson, C. 1994. Re-evaluation of the genus Closterocerus Westwood (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), with a revision of the Nearctic species. Insect Systematics and Evolution, 25: 125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Herrick, G.W. 1923. The maple case-bearer. Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin, 417: 115.Google Scholar
Hooper, R.R. 2001. The invasion of Canada by the yellow underwing (Noctua pronuba L.). Blue Jay, 59: 206207.Google Scholar
International Barcode of Life Project. 2014. Lepidoptera barcode of life [online]. Available from http://www.lepbarcoding.org/ [accessed 24 February 2014].Google Scholar
Labandiera, C. 2002. Paleobiology of middle Eocene plant-insect associations from the Pacific Northwest: a preliminary report. Rocky Mountain Geology, 37: 3159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marsh, P.M. 1979. Family Braconidae. In Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico. Volume 1, Edited by K.V. Krombein, P.D. Hurd, Jr., D.R. Smith, and B.D. Burks. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, District of Columbia, United States of America. Pp. 144295.Google Scholar
Moth Photographers Group. 2014. North American moth photographers group. Paraclemensia acerifoliella species page [online]. Available from http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/species.php?hodges=0181 [accessed 14 February 2014].Google Scholar
Nielsen, E.S. 1982. The maple leaf-cutter moth and its allies: a revision of Paraclemensia (Incurvariidae s.str.). Systematic Entomology, 7: 217238.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Noyes, J.S. 2013. Universal Chalcidoidea database [online]. Available from http://www.nhm.ac.uk/chalcidoids [accessed 4 March 2014].Google Scholar
Passoa, S. and Hollingsworth, C.S. 1996. Distribution, identification and rate of spread of Noctua pronuba (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in the northeastern United States. Entomological News, 107: 151160.Google Scholar
Pohl, G.R., Anweiler, G.G., Bird, C.D., Landry, J.-F., Macaulay, D.A., Maton, I., et al. 2013. 2013 update to the checklist of the Lepidoptera of Alberta. Alberta Lepidopterists’ Guild Newsletter, 2013: 1524.Google Scholar
Pohl, G.R., Anweiler, G.G., Schmidt, B.C., and Kondla, N.G. 2010. An annotated list of the Lepidoptera of Alberta, Canada. ZooKeys, 38: 1549.Google Scholar
Pohl, G.R., Saunders, C., Barr, W.B., Wartenbe, M.D., and Fownes, S.L. 2004. Caloptilia fraxinella (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae), a new pest of ash (Oleaceae: Fraxinus spp.) on the Canadian prairies. The Canadian Entomologist, 136: 733736.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Prentice, R.M. 1965. Forest Lepidoptera of Canada reported by the Forest Insect Survey, volume 4: Microlepidoptera. Canada Department of Forestry, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.Google Scholar
Robinson, G.S. 1999. HOSTS: a database of the host plants of the world’s Lepidoptera. Nota Lepidopterologica, 22: 3547.Google Scholar
Ross, D.A. 1958. The maple leaf cutter, Paraclemensia acerifoliella (Fitch) (Lepidoptera: Incurvariidae), descriptions of stages. The Canadian Entomologist, 90: 541555.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ross, D.A. 1962. Bionomics of the maple leaf cutter, Paraclemensia acerifoliella (Fitch), (Lepidoptera: Incurvariidae). The Canadian Entomologist, 94: 10531063.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schaarschmidt, F. 1992. The vegetation: fossil plants as witnesses of a warm climate. Messel: an insight into the history of life and of the earth, 1992: 2752.Google Scholar
Sunderlin, D., Loope, G., Parker, N.E., and Williams, C.J. 2011. Paleoclimatic and paleoecological implications of a Paleocene-Eocene fossil leaf assemblage, Chickaloon Formation, Alaska. Palaios, 26: 335345.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tamura, K., Peterson, D., Peterson, N., Stecher, G., Nei, M., and Kumar, S. 2011. MEGA5: molecular evolutionary genetics analysis using maximum likelihood, evolutionary distance, and maximum parsimony methods. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 28: 27312739.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wen, J. 1999. Evolution of eastern Asian and eastern North American disjunct distributions in flowering plants. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 30: 421455.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yoshimoto, C.M. 1983. Review of North American Pnigalio Schrank (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae). The Canadian Entomologist, 115: 9711000.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yu, D.S., Achterberg, C., and Horstman, K. 2006. Interactive catalogue of world Ichneumonoidea, taxonomy, biology, morphology and distribution [compact disc]. Taxapad, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.Google Scholar
Zhang, X., Vincent, L.A., Hogg, W.D., and Niitsoo, A. 2000. Temperature and precipitation trends in Canada during the 20th century. Atmosphere-Ocean, 38: 395429.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Paraclemensia acerifoliella (Lepidoptera: Incurvariidae) in western Canada: a newly discovered host, an expanded range, and biogeographical considerations
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Paraclemensia acerifoliella (Lepidoptera: Incurvariidae) in western Canada: a newly discovered host, an expanded range, and biogeographical considerations
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Paraclemensia acerifoliella (Lepidoptera: Incurvariidae) in western Canada: a newly discovered host, an expanded range, and biogeographical considerations
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *