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TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE (COLEOPTERA: SCOLYTIDAE) AND SIMULATION OF ITS PHENOLOGY

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

Barbara J. Bentz
Affiliation:
Intermountain Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Ogden, Utah, USA 84401
Jesse A. Logan
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA 24061
Gene D. Amman
Affiliation:
Intermountain Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Ogden, Utah, USA 84401

Abstract

Temperature-dependent development of the egg, larval, and pupal life-stages of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) was described using data from constant-temperature laboratory experiments. A phenology model describing the effect of temperature on the temporal distribution of the life-stages was developed using these data. Phloem temperatures recorded in a beetle-infested lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Douglas) were used as input to run the model. Results from model simulations suggest that inherent temperature thresholds in each life-stage help to synchronize population dynamics with seasonal climatic changes. This basic phenological information and the developed model will facilitate both research and management endeavors aimed at reducing losses in lodgepole pine stands caused by mountain pine beetle infestations.

Résumé

On trouvera ici la description du développement de l’oeuf, de la larve et de la nymphe sous l’influence de la température chez le Dendroctone du Pin ponderosa (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins), description élaborée à la suite d’observations en laboratoire dans des conditions constantes de température. Les données ont également servi à construire un modèle de la phénologie de l’insecte qui tient compte de l’effet de la température sur la répartition temporelle des divers stades. Les températures du phloème enregistrées dans un Pin ponderosa infesté de coléoptères ont été intégrées au modèle. Les résultats des simulations indiquent que les seuils thermiques inhérents à chacun des stades contribuent à synchroniser la dynamique de la population avec les changements climatiques saisonniers. Cette information phénologique de base et le modèle que nous avons mis au point faciliteront les tentatives de recherche et d’aménagement entreprises dans le but de limiter, dans les forêts de Pins ponderosa, les pertes occasionnées par les infestations de dendroctones.

[Traduit par la rédaction]

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1991

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TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE (COLEOPTERA: SCOLYTIDAE) AND SIMULATION OF ITS PHENOLOGY
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TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE (COLEOPTERA: SCOLYTIDAE) AND SIMULATION OF ITS PHENOLOGY
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