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Analysis of eye-tracking behaviours in a pediatric trauma simulation

  • Omar Damji (a1) (a2) (a3), Patricia Lee-Nobbee (a1) (a2), David Borkenhagen (a1) (a4) and Adam Cheng (a1) (a2) (a3)
Abstract

Eye-tracking devices are able to capture eye movements, which are further characterized by fixations. The application of eye tracking in a trauma setting has not been explored. Visual fixation can be utilized as a surrogate measure of attention during the management of a trauma patient. We aimed to determine the feasibility of using eye tracking and to characterize eye tracking behaviours of pediatric emergency medicine physicians during management of a simulated pediatric trauma patient. Each participant was equipped with a head-mounted eye-tracking device during a standardized simulated pediatric trauma scenario. Each session was video recorded, with visual fixations defined as >0.2 seconds, and characterized by start time, duration, and the area of interest. Data from seven videos were analysed; 35% of eye fixations were directed towards the mannequin, 16% towards the monitor, and 13% towards the bedside doctor. Visual eye tracking in a trauma simulation is feasible. Frequency of fixations tends to be highest towards the patient. Eye tracking within trauma simulation may provide new insights into quality improvement and inform advancements in pediatric trauma.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Correspondence to: Dr. Omar Damji, PGY2 Emergency Medicine (2022 Candidate), University of Calgary Cumming School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, 2888 Shaganappi Trail NW, Calgary, AB T3B 6A8; Email: odamji@ucalgary.ca
References
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Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 1481-8035
  • URL: /core/journals/canadian-journal-of-emergency-medicine
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