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Incidence of postintubation hemodynamic instability associated with emergent intubations performed outside the operating room: a systematic review

  • Robert Green (a1) (a2) (a3), Brian Hutton (a2) (a3) (a4), Jason Lorette (a1) (a5), Dominique Bleskie (a2) (a3), Lauralyn Mclntyre (a2) (a3) (a4) and Dean Fergusson (a2) (a3) (a4)...
Abstract
Objective:

Hemodynamic instability following emergent endotracheal intubation (EETI) is a potentially life-threatening adverse event. The objectives of this systematic literature review were to document the incidence of postintubation hemodynamic instability (PIHI), to determine the definitions for PIHI used in the available literature, and to examine factors associated with PIHI in adult patients who require EETI.

Data Source:

Articles published in Medline (1966–August 2012).

Study Selection:

This systematic review included adult, inhospital studies of EETIs. Studies with nonemergent or pediatric patient populations were excluded.

Data Extraction:

Two authors independently performed data abstraction. Disagreements were resolved by a third party. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale for Cohort Studies.

Data Synthesis:

We estimated the pooled prevalence of PIHI across studies using a random effects meta-analysis. Subgroups analyzed included study design, intubation setting, geographic location of the study, physician experience, medications used for sedation, neuromuscular blockade, and definition of PIHI. Eighteen studies were analyzed, with sample sizes from 84 to 2,833 patients. The incidence of PIHI ranged from 5 to 440 cases per 1,000 intubations, with a pooled estimate of 110 cases per 1,000 intubations (95% CI 65–167).

Conclusions:

PIHI was found to occur in 110 cases per 1,000 in-hospital, emergent intubations. However, heterogeneity among the included studies limits the reliability of this summary estimate. Further investigation is warranted.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Department of Anesthesia, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Room 377 Bethune Building, 1276 South Park Street, Halifax, NS B3H 2Y9; Dr.Robert.Green@dal.ca
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Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine
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