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Redrawing the Map and Resetting the Time: Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2020

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Copyright © The Authors 2003

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Footnotes

1

Originally published in electronic form in The Reach of Reflection: The Future of Phenomenology, ed. S. Crowell, L. Embree and S. J. Julian (17-45). Electron Press (at http://www.electronpress.com/reach.asp).

2

Francisco Varela died on May 28, 2001.

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