Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-7xspw Total loading time: 0.458 Render date: 2022-10-06T12:05:34.194Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Dynamic flow imaging using 320-detector row CT and motion coherence analysis in coronary aneurysms associated with Kawasaki disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 December 2017

Yamato Shimomiya
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Application, Ziosoft Inc.Tokyo, Japan
Michinobu Nagao*
Affiliation:
Department of Diagnostic Imaging & Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Tokyo, Japan
Yuzo Yamasaki
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
Takashi Shirasaka
Affiliation:
Medical Technology, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
Masatoshi Kondo
Affiliation:
Medical Technology, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
Tsukasa Kojima
Affiliation:
Medical Technology, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
Akihiro Nishie
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
Kenichiro Yamamura
Affiliation:
Pediatrics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
Hiroshi Honda
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
*
Correspondence to: Michinobu Nagao, Department of Diagnostic Imaging & Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 162-8666, Japan. Tel: +81-3-3353-8111; Fax: +81-3-5269-9247; E-mail: nagao.michinobu@twmu.ac.jp.

Abstract

Introduction

We propose a new dynamic flow imaging using 320-detector row CT, and investigate the assessment of coronary flow in aneurysms of Kawasaki disease in adulthood.

Methods

Six patients with Kawasaki disease and coronary aneurysms associated (26.7 years old) and six controls were enrolled. Dynamic coronary CT angiography with 320-row CT was continuously performed at mid-diastole throughout 15–25 cardiac cycles with prospective Electrocardiogram gating after injection of contrast media. Dynamic data sets of 15–25 cycles were computed into 90–100 data sets by motion coherence image processing. Next, time–density curves for coronary arteries were calculated for all the phases. On the basis of the maximum slope method, coronary flow index was defined as the ratio of the maximum upslope of the attenuation of coronary arteries to the upslope of the attenuation of ascending aorta on the time–density curves. Coronary flow indexes for the proximal and distal sites of coronary arteries and intra-aneurysm were measured.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2017 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Kawasaki, T. Acute febrile mucocutaneous syndrome with lymphoid involvement with specific desquamation of the fingers and toes in children. J Allergy. 1967; 16: 178222.Google ScholarPubMed
2. Mandell, BF, Hoffman, GS. Rheumatic diseases and the cardiovascular system: vasculitis: Kawasaki disease. In: Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, (eds) Braunwald’s Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th edn. Elsevier Saunders, Philadelphia, PA, 2005: 21052160.Google Scholar
3. Nakamura, Y, Yashiro, M, Uehara, R, et al. Epidemiologic features of Kawasaki disease in Japan: results of the 2009-2010 Nationwide Survey. J Epidemiology. 2012; 22: 216221.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4. Lacopo, C, David, C, Emanuela, A, et al. Adolescent Kawasaki disease: usefulness of 64-slice CT coronary angiography for follow-up investigation. Pediatr Radiol. 2011; 41: 11651173.Google Scholar
5. Earls, JP, Berman, EL, Urban, BA, et al. Prospectively gated transverse coronary CT angiography versus retrospectively gated helical technique: improved image quality and reduced radiation dose. Radiology. 2008; 246: 742753.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6. Nagao, M, Yamasaki, Y, Kamitani, T, et al. Quantification of coronary flow using dynamic angiography with 320-detector row CT and motion coherence image processing: detection of ischemia for intermediate coronary stenosis. Eur J Radiol 2016; 85: 9961003.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7. Nagao, M, Yamasaki, Y, Kamitani, T, et al. Geometrical characteristics of aortic root and left ventricular dysfunction in aortic stenosis: quantification of 256-slice coronary CT angiography. Heart Vessels 2017; 32: 558565.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Dibyendu, S, Andrew, M, Jane, CB, et al. Image-based modeling of hemodynamics in coronary artery aneurysms caused by Kawasaki disease. Biomech Model Mechanobiol 2012; 11: 915932.Google Scholar
9. Hamaoka, K, Onouchi, Z, Kamiya, Y, Sakata, K. Evaluation of coronary flow velocity dynamics and flow reserve in patients with Kawasaki disease by means of a Doppler guide wire. J Am Coll Cardiol 1998; 31: 833840.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10. Nagao, M, Kido, T, Watanabe, K, et al. Functional assessment of coronary artery flow using adenosine stress dual-energy CT: a preliminary study. Int J Cardiovasc Imaging 2011; 27: 471481.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11. Nakazato, R, Park, HB, Berman, DS, et al. Noninvasive fractional flow reserve derived from computed tomography angiography for coronary lesions of intermediate stenosis severity results from the DeFACTO study. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 2013; 6: 881889.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12. Karmonic, C, Partovi, S, Rengier, F, et al. Hemodynamic assessment of partial mechanical circulatory support: data derived from computed tomography angiographic images and computational fluid dynamics. Cardiovasc Diagn Ther 2015; 5: 160165.Google Scholar

Shimomiya et al supplementary material

Shimomiya et al supplementary material 1

Download Shimomiya et al supplementary material(Video)
Video 5 MB
3
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Dynamic flow imaging using 320-detector row CT and motion coherence analysis in coronary aneurysms associated with Kawasaki disease
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Dynamic flow imaging using 320-detector row CT and motion coherence analysis in coronary aneurysms associated with Kawasaki disease
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Dynamic flow imaging using 320-detector row CT and motion coherence analysis in coronary aneurysms associated with Kawasaki disease
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *