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More Facts about our Oldest Latin Manuscripts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 February 2009

E. A. Lowe
Affiliation:
Oxford.

Extract

In an article entitled ‘Some Facts about our Oldest Latin Manuscripts,’ which appeared in this journal, the present writer put together a group of forty-seven MSS. which had this one feature in common, that each page or each column of a page they contained began with a large letter, regardless of whether that letter occurred in the middle of a sentence, or even in the middle of a word. It so happened that the list thus drawn up was composed almost entirely of very ancient MSS.; indeed, it contained a very large proportion of the oldest MSS. extant. In the circumstances it seemed useful to note down the behaviour of these MSS. with respect to four other features—namely, the manner of indicating the omission of m and n at the end of lines, the use of running titles in the top margin, the size and arrangement of the written space, and the manner of signing quires.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Classical Association 1928

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References

page 43 note 1 Classical Quarterly XIX. (1925), pp. 197208Google Scholar.

page 43 note 2 For a list of these, as well as for a description of the features characterizing our oldest MSS., see Lowe, E. A. and Rand, E. K., A Sixth-Century Fragment of the Letters of Pliny the Younger, pp. 1320 (Washington, 1922)Google Scholar.

page 56 note 1 References to literature and to published facsimiles of most of the MSS. mentioned in this article will be found in Traube's, Vorlesungen und Abhandlungen I. 161261Google Scholar, and in Miscellanea XV. 34–61.

page 57 note 1 He wrote ff. 1–67v.

page 57 note 2 E.g. f. 21v.

page 57 note 3 Ff. 26, 30, 51 et passim.

page 57 note 4 E.g. ff. 26v, 30v, 51v, etc.

page 57 note 5 Ff. 5v. 6v, 12, 14v, etc.

page 57 note 6 C. H. Turner used this MS. for the purpose of comparing it with the Worcester leaves in eighth - century uncial. Cf. Early Worcester MSS., p. xv, Oxford, 1916Google Scholar.

page 57 note 7 Traube, L., Nomina Sacra, p. 241Google Scholar.

page 58 note 1 Traube, L., Nomina Sacra, p. 241Google Scholar.

page 58 note 2 Traube, , Hieronymi Chronicorum Codicis Floriacensis Fragmenta, p. vii, Leyden, 1902Google Scholar; published in Codices Graeci it Latini photographice depicti, Suppl. I.

page 60 note 1 The word contuli occurs in some other MSS. at the ends of quires. It is generally written out; occasionally it occurs in Tironian symbols.

page 60 note 2 Lindsay, W. M., Palaeographia Latino, II. (1923), pp. 510Google Scholar.

page 61 note 1 Palaeographia Latino. V. (1927), pp. 5277Google Scholar.

page 62 note 1 For the sake of convenience I repeat the list of forty-seven MSS. examined in my former article:

1. Vatic. 3256: Virgil, Square capitals, s. V.

2. Vatic. 3225: Virg., Rustic capitals, s. IV.

3. Florence Laur. 39. 1: Virg., Rustic, s. V.

4. Vatic. Pal. 1631: Virg., Rustic, s. V.

5. Naples IV. A 8: Lucan, Rustic, s. IV.

6. Vatic. 5750: Persius, Juvenal, Rustic, s. V.

7. Orleans 192: Sallust, Rustic, s. V.

8. Vatic. Reg. 2077: Cicero, Rustic, s. IV.

9. Turin A II. 2: Cicero, Rustic, s. IV.

10. Vatic. Pal. 24: Livy, Rustic, s. V.

11. Verona XL. (38): Livy, Uncial, s. V.

12. Paris 5730: Livy, Uncial, s. V.

13. Vatic. 10696: Livy, Uncial, s. V.

14. Vienna 15: Livy, Uncial, s. V.

15. Vatic. 5757: Cicero, Uncial, s. IV./V.

16. Vienna 1a: Pliny, Hist. Nat., Uncial, s. V.

17. Rome, Vitt. Em. 2099 (sess. 55): Pliny, H.N., Uncial, s. V.

18. St. Paul in Carinthia XXV. 2. 36: Pliny, H.N., Uncial, s. V ex.

19. New York, Morgan M 462: Pliny, Epist., Uncial, s. V./VI.

20. Vatic. 5750: Fronto, Uncial, s. V.

21. Paris 12161: Asper, Uncial, s. V ex.

22. Vienna 1: Ulpian., Uncial, s. V. ex.

23. Verona XV. (13): Gaius, Uncial, s. V ex.

24. Vatic. 5766: Frag. ante-Justin., Uncial, s. V

25. Flor. Laur. s.n.: Justinian, Uncial, s. VI.

26. Verona LXII. (60): Justin., Uncial, s. VI.

27. Paris 17225: Evangelia, Uncial, s. V.

28. Naples (olim Vienna 1235): Evang., Uncial, s. V ex.

29. Trent (olim Vienna 1185): Evang., Uncial, s. V ex.

30. Vatic. 5763. Hiob, Judic., Uncial, s. V ex.

31. Milan Ambr. C 73 inf.: Luc. fr., Uncial, s. V ex.

32. Paris 6400 G: Act. and Apoc., Uncial, s. V.

33. Paris Gr. 107: Ep. Pauli, Uncial, s. V./VI.

34. Naples (olim Vienna 16): Apoc. Ep. Apost, Uncial, s. V.

35. Leon Cath. 15: Vet. Test., Semi-Uncial, s. VII.

36. Paris 10592: Cyprian, Uncial, s. V ex.

37. St. Gall 213: Lactantius, Uncial, s. V.

38. Verona XIII. (11): Hilar., Uncial, s. V ex.

39. St. Paul in Carin. XXV. 3. 19: Ambros., Uncial, s. VI in.

40. Würzburg th. q. 2: Hieron., Uncial, s. V.

41. Verona XVII. (15): Hieron., Uncial, s. VI ex.

42. Verona XXVIII. (26): Augustin., Uncial, s. V in.

43. Petrograd Q. v. I. 3: Augustin., Uncial, s. V.

44. Paris 12634: Augustin., Uncial, s. VI./VII.

45. Vatic. 5766: Cassian, Uncial, s. VIII.

46. Verona LI. (49): Maximus Taur., Uncial, s. VI in.

47. St. Gall 910: Glossar., Uncial, s. VIII in.

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