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    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Martyn, J.R.C. 1970. A New Approach to Juvenal’s First Satire. Antichthon, Vol. 4, p. 53.


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Cleopatra as Fatale Monstrum (Horace, Carm. 1. 37. 21)

  • J. V. Luce (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0009838800001865
  • Published online: 01 February 2009
Abstract

The pregnant phrase fatale monstrum comes at a crucial point in the third and longest of the three sentences of the ‘Cleopatra Ode’. Before it Cleopatra is being hissed from the stage of history with cries of disapproval; after it she is recalled to receive plaudit after plaudit for her courage and resolution. The phrase is emphasized by its position at the start of a stanza followed by a marked pause. Prima facie it is the climax of the vituperation, and has often so been taken. T. E. Page, for example, comments: ‘Horace speaks of Cleopatra as not human, but a hideous and portentous creature sent by destiny to cause horror and alarm.’

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The Classical Quarterly
  • ISSN: 0009-8388
  • EISSN: 1471-6844
  • URL: /core/journals/classical-quarterly
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