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Bipolar depression in children and adolescents

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 April 2013

Melissa S. DeFilippis*
Affiliation:
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA
Karen Dineen Wagner
Affiliation:
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA
*
*Address for correspondence: Melissa S. DeFilippis, MD, 301 University Blvd., Galveston, TX 77555-0188, USA. (Email msdefili@utmb.edu)

Abstract

Children and adolescents with bipolar disorder may have depression as the presenting mood state. It is important for clinicians to distinguish between unipolar and bipolar depression in youth. Depressive episodes are common during the course of bipolar illness in children and adolescents. Evidence-based treatments are needed to guide clinicians’ treatment decisions for youth with bipolar depression. This article reviews the prevalence, diagnosis, course, and treatment of bipolar depression in youth, and emphasizes the need for large, controlled treatment studies in the pediatric population.

Type
Review Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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