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Metabolites: novel therapeutics or “me-too” drugs? Using desvenlafaxine as an example

  • Thomas L. Schwartz (a1)
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      Metabolites: novel therapeutics or “me-too” drugs? Using desvenlafaxine as an example
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Abstract
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Corresponding author
*Address for correspondence: Thomas L. Schwartz, Associate Professor, Director of Adult Clinical Services, Dept. of Psychiatry, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA. (Email schwartt@upstate.edu)
References
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2. CO-MED. Combining Medications to Enhance Depression Outcomes. http://www.co-med.org. Accessed 5/1/12.
3.Preskorn SH. Understanding outliers on the usual dose response curve: venlafaxine as a way to phenotype patients in terms of their CYP 2D6 status and why it matters. J Psychiatr Pract. 2010; 16(1): 4649.
4.Nichols AL, Focht K, Jiang O, et al. . Pharmacokinetics of venlafaxine extended release 75 mg and desvenlafaxine 50 mg in healthy CYP2D6 extensive and poor metabolizers: a randomized, open-label, two-period, parallel-group, crossover study. Clin Drug Investig. 2001; 31(3): 155167.
5.Lobello KW, Preskorn SH, Guico-Pabia CJ. CYP2D6 phenotype predicts antidepressant efficacy of venlafaxine. J Clin Psychiatry. 2010; 71(11): 14821487.
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12.Bech P, Boyer P, Germain JM, et al. . HAM-D17 and HAM-D6 sensitivity to change in relation to desvenlafaxine dose and baseline depression severity in major depressive disorder. Pharmacopsychiatry. 2010; 43(7): 271276.
13.Norman T. The new antidepressants—mechanisms of action. Aust Prescr. 1999; 22: 106108.
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CNS Spectrums
  • ISSN: 1092-8529
  • EISSN: 2165-6509
  • URL: /core/journals/cns-spectrums
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