Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768dbb666b-tcprc Total loading time: 0.334 Render date: 2023-02-03T04:22:37.781Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Luck and Manipulation Cases: A Response to Professor Haji

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 November 2015

NEIL LEVY*
Affiliation:
Macquarie University

Abstract

In his paper published in this issue, Ishtiyaque Haji argues that the challenge to compatibilism from luck is not novel. Rather, the challenge is identical to that from manipulation cases, and compatibilists already have responses to that challenge. In response, I distinguish two different luck problems for compatibilism. One challenge is seen in manipulation cases, but the challenge he identifies is different from the challenge from manipulation. The luck problem is therefore novel, and the existing solutions to the challenge from manipulation fail to address it.

Dans un article publié dans ce numéro, Ishtiyaque Haji soutient que la difficulté posée par la chance au compatibilisme n’est pas nouvelle, mais qu’elle est en fait identique au problème inhérent aux cas de manipulation, auquel les compatibilistes ont déjà répondu. Dans cet article, je distingue deux problèmes que la chance pose au compatibilisme. Si l’un des deux est bien celui que l’on trouve dans les cas de manipulation, celui identifié par Haji est cependant différent. La difficulté soulevée par la chance est donc bien originale, et les solutions au problème des cas de manipulation échouent à y répondre.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Philosophical Association 2015 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Coffman, E.J. 2007 “Thinking about Luck.” Synthese 158: 385398.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haji, Ishtiyaque 2004 “Active Control, Agent-Causation and Free Action.” Philosophical Explorations 7: 131148.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haji, Ishtiyaque 2009 Incompatibilism’s Allure. Peterborough, ON.: Broadview.Google Scholar
Haji, Ishtiyaque 2015 “Luck, Compatibilism, and Libertarianism.” Dialogue, doi:10.1017/S0012217315000682.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haji, Ishtiyaque, and Cuypers, Stefaan 2007 “Magical Agents, Global Induction, and the Internal/External Debate.” Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85: 343371.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hurley, Susan 1993 “Justice Without Constitutive Luck.” In Griffith, A.P. (ed.), Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 179212.Google Scholar
Levy, Neil 2011 Hard Luck. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Levy, Neil 2014 Consciousness and Moral Responsibility. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McKenna, Michael 2004 “Responsibility and Globally Manipulated Agents.” Philosophical Topics 32: 169192.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McKenna, Michael 2008 “A hard-line reply to Pereboom’s four-case manipulation argument.” Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (1): 42159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mele, Alfred 1995 Autonomous Agents. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Mele, Alfred 2006 Free Will and Luck. New York: Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thomas, Nagel 1979 “Moral Luck.” In Mortal Questions. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2438.Google Scholar
Pérez de Calleja, Mirja 2014 “Cross-World Luck at the Time of Decision is a Problem for Compatibilists as Well.” Philosophical Explorations 17: 112125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pritchard, Duncan 2005 Epistemic Luck. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Uhlmann, E.L. and Cohen, G.L.. 2005 “Constructed criteria: Redefining merit to justify discrimination.” Psychological Science 16: 474480.Google Scholar
1
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Luck and Manipulation Cases: A Response to Professor Haji
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Luck and Manipulation Cases: A Response to Professor Haji
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Luck and Manipulation Cases: A Response to Professor Haji
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *