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Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) Science and the CBRNE Science Medical Operations Science Support Expert (CMOSSE)

  • C. Norman Coleman (a1), Judith L. Bader (a1), John F. Koerner (a1), Chad Hrdina (a1), Kenneth D. Cliffer (a1), John L. Hick (a1), James J. James (a2), Monique K. Mansoura (a3), Alicia A. Livinski (a4), Scott V. Nystrom (a1), Andrea DiCarlo-Cohen (a5), Maria Julia Marinissen (a1), Lynne Wathen (a1), Jessica M. Appler (a1), Brooke Buddemeier (a6), Rocco Casagrande (a7), Derek Estes (a1), Patrick Byrne (a1), Edward M. Kennedy (a1), Ann A. Jakubowski (a8), Cullen Case (a9), David M. Weinstock (a10), Nicholas Dainiak (a11), Dan Hanfling (a1), Andrew L. Garrett (a1), Natalie N. Grant (a1), Daniel Dodgen (a1), Irwin Redlener (a12), Thomas F. MacKAY (a1), Meghan Treber (a1), Mary J. Homer (a1), Tammy P. Taylor (a13), Aubrey Miller (a14), George Korch (a1) and Richard Hatchett (a15)...

Abstract

A national need is to prepare for and respond to accidental or intentional disasters categorized as chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or explosive (CBRNE). These incidents require specific subject-matter expertise, yet have commonalities. We identify 7 core elements comprising CBRNE science that require integration for effective preparedness planning and public health and medical response and recovery. These core elements are (1) basic and clinical sciences, (2) modeling and systems management, (3) planning, (4) response and incident management, (5) recovery and resilience, (6) lessons learned, and (7) continuous improvement. A key feature is the ability of relevant subject matter experts to integrate information into response operations. We propose the CBRNE medical operations science support expert as a professional who (1) understands that CBRNE incidents require an integrated systems approach, (2) understands the key functions and contributions of CBRNE science practitioners, (3) helps direct strategic and tactical CBRNE planning and responses through first-hand experience, and (4) provides advice to senior decision-makers managing response activities. Recognition of both CBRNE science as a distinct competency and the establishment of the CBRNE medical operations science support expert informs the public of the enormous progress made, broadcasts opportunities for new talent, and enhances the sophistication and analytic expertise of senior managers planning for and responding to CBRNE incidents.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence and reprint requests to C. Norman Coleman, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, CBRNE, US Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC 20515 (e-mail: ccoleman@mail.nih.gov).

References

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