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A Point-Of-Care Test for H1N1 Influenza

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 April 2013

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Abstract

Type
Letters to the Editor
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc. 2010

To the Editor: I read the recent article by Louie et alReference Louie, Kitano, Brock, Derlet and Kost1 with a great interest. Louie et alReference Louie, Kitano, Brock, Derlet and Kost1 mentioned point-of-care test (POCT) deficiencies and also raised policy recommendations that will enhance preparedness. Indeed, the POCT is confirmed for its usefulness in the management of emerging infection, including H1N1 influenza.Reference Kost, Hale and Brock2 However, the preparedness for emerging infectious diseases such as H1N1 influenza can still be questionable. It is no doubt that we can prepare for the reemergence of known diseases, but newly emerging diseases are usually unpredictable. The role of the POCT in diagnosis must be based on the data for already-existing emerging infectious diseases. The actual role of the POCT might be in molecular epidemiology as a tool for surveillance of old diseases and for monitoring of a new mutation that can lead to a newly emerging infection.

References

1.Louie, RF, Kitano, T, Brock, TK, Derlet, R, Kost, GJ.Point-of-care testing for pandemic influenza and biothreats. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2009;3(suppl 2)S193S202.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2.Kost, GJ, Hale, KN, Brock, TK.Point-of-care testing for disasters: needs assessment, strategic planning, and future design. Clin Lab Med. 2009;29 (3):583605.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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