Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-klmjj Total loading time: 0.234 Render date: 2021-09-23T00:30:51.732Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

BLACK PROTESTANT VIEWS OF SCIENCE

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 January 2019

Cleve Tinsley IV*
Affiliation:
Department of Religion, Rice University
Pamela J. Prickett
Affiliation:
Department of Sociology, University of Amsterdam
Elaine Howard Ecklund
Affiliation:
Department of Sociology, Rice University
*Corresponding
*Corresponding author: Cleve Tinsley IV, Department of Religion, Rice University, 6100 Main Street - MS 15, Houston, TX 77005-1892. E-mail: cvt4@rice.edu

Abstract

We ask how Black Protestants frame the connection between religion and science, analyzing fifty in-depth interviews with Black Protestants of different socioeconomic backgrounds who attend churches in two U.S. cities. Although individuals across the sample observe some tension, or incompatibility, between religion and science, Black Protestants from lower socioeconomic backgrounds tended to perceive much more tension when compared with those from higher socioeconomic backgrounds. However, when science is thought to contribute to improving health conditions (e.g., medical improvements to diagnose or prevent birth defects), individuals from both SES backgrounds framed religion and science as compatible. This lack of tension in regards to medicine challenges prevailing wisdom about lower-income African Americans’ attitudes towards medicine. We draw out the implications of these findings for larger discussions about trust toward science and scientific communities, elucidating Black Protestant particularities and perspectives in tensions between science and religion as a foundation for further research.

Type
State of the Art
Copyright
Copyright © Hutchins Center for African and African American Research 2019 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Barbour, Ian G. (1990). Religion in an Age of Science: The Gifford Lectures, 1989–1991, Volume 1. New York: HarperCollins Publishers.Google Scholar
Beasley, Samuel T., Miller, I. S. Keino, and Cokley, Kevin O. (2015). Exploring the Impact of Increasing the Number of Black Men in Professional Psychology. Journal of Black Studies, 46(7): 704722.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Billingsley, Andrew (1999). Mighty Like a River: The Black Church and Social Reform. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Boulware, L. Ebony, Cooper, Lisa A., Ratner, Lloyd E., LaVeist, Thomas A., and Powe, Neil R. (2003). Race and Trust in the Health Care System. Public Health Reports, 118(4): 358365.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Caldwell, Cleopatra. H., Chatters, Linda M., Billingsley, Andrew, and Taylor, Robert J. (1995). Church-Based Support Programs for Elderly Black Adults: Congregational and Clergy Characteristics. In Kimble, Melvin A., McFadden, Susan H., Ello, James W., and Seeber, James J. (Eds.), Aging, Spirituality, and Religion: A Handbook, pp. 306324. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press.Google Scholar
Christerson, B., Edwards, Korie L., and Emerson, Michael O (2005). Against All Odds: The Struggle for Racial Integration in Religious Organizations. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
Corbie-Smith, Giselle (1999). The Continuing Legacy of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: Considerations for Clinical Investigation. American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 317(1): 58.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ecklund, Elaine Howard (2010). Science vs. Religion: What Scientists Really Think. New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ecklund, Elaine Howard, and Scheitle, Christopher P. (2017). Religion vs. Science: What Religious People Really Think. New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edwards, Korie L. (2009). Race, Religion, and Worship: Are African American Worship Practices Distinct? Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 48: 3052.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellison, Christopher G., and Musick, Marc A. (1995). Conservative Protestantism and Public Opinion towards Science. Review of Religious Research, 36(3): 245262.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Emerson, Michael O., and Smith, Christian (2000). Divided by Faith: Evangelical Religion and the Problem of Race in America. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Evans, John H. (2002). Playing God? Human Genetic Engineering and the Rationalization of Public Bioethical Debate. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Evans, John H. (2011). Epistemological and Moral Conflict between Religion and Science. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 50: 707727.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evans, John H. (2013). The Growing Social and Moral Conflict between Conservative Protestantism and Science. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 52: 368385.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gamble, Vanessa N. (1999). Race and the New Genetics: A Historical Perspective. In Hager, M. (Ed.), The Implications of Genetics for Health Professionals, pp. 163185. New York: Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation.Google Scholar
Gauchat, Gordon (2011). The Cultural Authority of Science: Public Trust and Acceptance of Organized Scientists. Public Understanding of Science, 20(6): 751770.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gauchat, Gordon (2012). Politicization of Science in the Public Sphere: A Study of Public Trust in the United States. American Sociological Review, 77(2): 167187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Granger, Maury, and Price, Gregory (2007). The Tree of Science and Original Sin: Do Christian Religious Beliefs Constrain the Supply of Scientists. The Journal of Socio-Economics, 36(1):144160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Glaude, Eddie S. Jr. (2000). Exodus!: Religion, Race, and Nation in Early Nineteenth-Century Black America. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Hackett, Conrad D., and Lindsay, Michael (2008). Measuring Evangelicalism. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 47: 499514.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnson, Sylvester (2004). The Myth of Ham in Nineteenth-Century American Christianity: Race, Heathens, and the People of God. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lincoln, C. Eric, and Mamiya, Lawrence (1990). The Black Church in the African American Experience. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morning, Ann J (2011). The Nature of Race: How Scientists Think and Teach about Human Difference. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Omi, Michael, and Winant, Howard (2015 [1994]). Racial Formation in the United States: From the 1960s to the 1990s, 2nd ed. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Paris, Peter J. (1985). The Social Teaching of the Black Churches. Philadelphia, PA: Fortress Press.Google Scholar
Paul, Diane B. (1998). Controlling Human Heredity: 1865 to the Present. New York: Humanity Books.Google Scholar
Pattillo-McCoy, Mary (1998). Church Culture as Strategy of Action in the Black Community. American Sociological Review, 63(6): 767784.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pew U.S. Religious Landscape Survey (2009). <http://religions.pewforum.org> (accessed June 11, 2016).+(accessed+June+11,+2016).>Google Scholar
Pinn, Anthony (2003). Terror and Triumph: The Nature of Black Religion. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press.Google Scholar
Reverby, Susan (2001). More than Fact and Fiction: Cultural Memory and the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. Hastings Center Report, 31: 2228.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sherkat, Darren (2011). Religion and Scientific Literacy in the United States. Social Science Quarterly, 92(5): 11341150.Google Scholar
Shelton, James E., and Emerson, Michael O. (2012). Blacks and Whites in Christian America: How Racial Discrimination Shapes Religious Convictions. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
Skloot, Rebecca (2010). The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. New York: Broadway Paperbacks.Google Scholar
Steensland, Brian, Park, Jerry Z., Regnerus, Mark, Robinson, Lynn, Wilcox, W. Bradford, and Woodberry, Robert (2000). The Measure of American Religion: Toward Improving the State of the Art. Social Forces, 79(1): 291318.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Strauss, Anselm L., and Corbin, Juliet M. (1998). Basics of Qualitative Research: Techniques and Procedures for Developing Grounded Theory. 2nd ed. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
Taylor, Marylee C., and Merino, Stephen M. (2011). Race, Religion, and Beliefs about Racial Inequality. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 634(1): 6077.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Taylor, Robert J., Chatters, Linda M., and Levin, Jeff (2004). Religion in the Lives of African Americans: Social, Psychological, and Health Perspectives. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.Google Scholar
Thomas, Stephen B., Quinn, S. C., Billingsley, Andrew, and Caldwell, Cleopatra (1994). The Characteristics of Northern Black Churches with Community Health Outreach Programs. American Journal of Public Health, 84: 575579.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thumma, Scott (2001). Megachurches Cluster in Bible Belt, Study Shows. Faith Communities Today (FACT). Hartford, CT: The Hartford Institute for Religion Research.Google Scholar
Witherspoon, Karen M., and Speight, Suzette L. (2009). An Exploration of African Americans’ Interests and Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Traditional and Nontraditional Careers. Journal of Black Studies, 39(6): 888904.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Woodberry, Robert, Park, Jerry Z., Kellstedt, Lyman A., Regnerus, Mark, and Steensland, Brian (2012). The Measure of American Religious Traditions: Theoretical and Measurement Considerations. Social Forces, 91(1): 6573.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

BLACK PROTESTANT VIEWS OF SCIENCE
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

BLACK PROTESTANT VIEWS OF SCIENCE
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

BLACK PROTESTANT VIEWS OF SCIENCE
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *