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Classwide Peer Tutoring: A Comparison of “Tutor Huddle” and Teacher-Directed Procedures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 October 2015

Elaine Chapman*
Affiliation:
Murdoch University
David Leach
Affiliation:
Murdoch University
*
Psychology Section, School of Social Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, 6150.
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Abstract

A 12-week classwide peer tutoring program in multiplication based on the “tutor huddle” procedure was compared with a conventional teacher-directed procedure. Two sixth-grade classes (n=52) were divided into higher and lower achievers on the basis of an initial multiplication pretest. The higher-achieving members (n=26) were then randomly assigned to be either tutor huddle tutors or teacher-directed tutors. The remaining class members (n=26) were randomly assigned to be either tutor huddle tutees or teacher-directed tutees. Results indicated that the tutor huddle tutors made significantly greater gains in multiplication skills than the teacher-directed tutors. There was no significant difference in the gains made by the two tutee groups. Benefits of the tutor huddle procedure for tutors and practical implications for its use in classroom settings were discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Australian Psychological Society 1991

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References

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