Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-5rzhg Total loading time: 0.342 Render date: 2021-11-28T10:05:47.856Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Changing understandings of local knowledge in island environments

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 June 2017

MATTHEW LAUER*
Affiliation:
San Diego State University – Anthropology, 5500 Campanile Dr, San Diego, CA 92182-0001, USA
*
*Correspondence: Dr Matthew Lauer email: mlauer@mail.sdsu.edu

Summary

Island ecosystems have rich marine biodiversity and high levels of terrestrial endemism, but are potentially the most vulnerable to climate change and anthropogenic stressors. To effectively manage environments, scholars and conservation practitioners have increasingly turned their attention to local islander knowledge (LK) and practices. To date, much of the literature treats LK definitionally rather than examining its theoretical underpinnings. This review focuses explicitly on the concept of LK and it describes three discernible phases of research marked by conceptual shifts. Over the 20th century, LK underwent a dramatic reversal from something understood as inferior and deficient to something that is valuable and empirically sound. This shift ushered in widespread acceptance of local islander knowledge as a unique, rich corpus of information that could be tapped by Western science to enhance community-based resource management. Over the last several decades, a third phase of LK research has emerged in which a more dynamic framing has developed, emphasizing LK's hybrid and adaptive dimensions, as well as its constitutive entanglements with other social–ecological processes. This has expanded the scope of inquiry into the strategies islanders employ as they adapt to changing social and environmental milieus, and as they attempt to co-produce knowledge with scientists and conservation practitioners.

Type
Subject Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © Foundation for Environmental Conservation 2017 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Agrawal, A. (1995) Dismantling the divide between indigenous and scientific knowledge. Development and Change 26: 413439.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armitage, D., Marschke, M. & Plummer, R. (2008) Adaptive co-management and the paradox of learning. Global environmental change 18 (1): 8698.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armitage, D. R. (2003) Traditional agroecological knowledge, adaptive management and the socio-politics of conservation in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. Environmental Conservation 30 (01): 7990.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Aswani, S. (1997) Customary Sea Tenure and Artisanal Fishing in the Roviana and Vonavona Lagoons, Solomon Islands: The Evolutionary Ecology of Marine Resource Utilization, PhD Thesis. University of Hawaii, Department of Anthropology, Honolulu, HI, USA.Google Scholar
Aswani, S. (2002) Assessing the effects of changing demographic and consumption patterns on sea tenure regimes in the Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands. Ambio 31 (4): 272284.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Aswani, S. & Hamilton, R. J. (2004) Integrating indigenous ecological knowledge and customary sea tenure with marine and social science for conservation of bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) in Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands. Environmental Conservation 31: 6983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Aswani, S. & Lauer, M. (2014) Indigenous people's detection of rapid ecological change. Conservation Biology 28 (3): 820828.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Aswani, S., Vaccaro, I., Abernethy, K., Albert, S. & de Pablo, J. F. L. (2015) Can perceptions of environmental and climate change in island communities assist in adaptation planning locally? Environmental management 56 (6): 14871501.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bambridge, T., ed. (2016) The Rahui: Legal Pluralism in Polynesian Traditional Management of Resources and Territories. Acton, Australia: ANU Press.Google Scholar
Bartlett, C. Y., Pakoa, K. & Manua, C. (2009) Marine reserve phenomenon in the Pacific islands. Marine Policy 33 (4): 673678.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berdej, S. & Armitage, D. (2016) Bridging for better conservation fit in Indonesia's coastal-marine systems. Frontiers in Marine Science 3: 101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berkes, F. (1993) Traditional ecological knowledge in perspective. In: Traditional Ecological Knowledge Concepts and Cases, ed. Inglis, J., pp. 110. Ottawa, ON, Canada: International Program on Traditional Ecological Knowledge: International Development Research Centre.Google Scholar
Berkes, F., Reid, W. V., Wilbanks, T. J. & Capistrano, D. (2006) Conclusions: bridging scales and knowledge systems. In: Bridging Scales and Knowledge Systems: Concepts and Applications in Ecosystem Assessment, eds. Reid, W. V., Berkes, F. & Wilbanks, T. J., pp. 315331. Washington, DC, USA: Island Press.Google Scholar
Brockington, D., Duffy, R. & Igoe, J. (2008) Nature Unbound: Conservation, Capitalism and the Future of Protected Areas. London, UK: Earthscan.Google Scholar
Brosius, J. P. (2006) What counts as local knowledge in global environmental assessments and conventions? In: Bridging Scales and Knowledge Systems: Concepts and Applications in Ecosystem Assessment, eds. Reid, W. V., Berkes, F., Wilbanks, T. & Capistran, D., pp. 129144. Washington, DC, USA: Island Press.Google Scholar
Carr, L. M. & Heyman, W. D. (2012) “It's about seeing what's actually out there”: quantifying fishers’ ecological knowledge and biases in a small-scale commercial fishery as a path toward co-management. Ocean & Coastal Management 69: 118132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cinner, J., Marnane, M. J., McClanahan, T. R. & Almany, G. R. (2006) Periodic closures as adaptive coral reef management in the Indo-Pacific. Ecology and Society 11 (1): 31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cinner, J. E. & Aswani, S. (2007) Integrating customary management into marine conservation. Biological Conservation 140 (3–4): 201216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cohen, P. J. & Foale, S. J. (2013) Sustaining small-scale fisheries with periodically harvested marine reserves. Marine Policy 37: 278287.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cohen, P. J. & Steenbergen, D. J. (2015) Social dimensions of local fisheries co-management in the Coral Triangle. Environmental Conservation 42 (3): 278288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Conklin, H. C. (1954) The Relation of Hanunóo Culture to the Plant World. New Haven, CT, USA: Yale University.Google Scholar
Connell, J. (2013) Islands at Risk? Environments, Economies and Contemporary Change. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cooke, B. & Kothari, U. (2001) Participation: The New Tyranny? London, UK: Zed Books.Google Scholar
Davidson-Hunt, I. J. & O'Flaherty, M. R. (2007) Researchers, indigenous peoples, and place-based learning communities. Society & Natural Resources 20 (4): 291305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, A. & Ruddle, K. (2010) Constructing confidence: rational skepticism and systematic enquiry in local ecological knowledge research. Ecological Applications 20 (3): 880894.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Díaz, S., Demissew, S., Carabias, J., Joly, C., Lonsdale, M., Ash, N., Larigauderie, A., Adhikari, J. R., Arico, S. & Báldi, A. (2015) The IPBES conceptual framework – connecting nature and people. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 14: 116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dressler, W., Büscher, B., Schoon, M., Brockington, D. A. N., Hayes, T., Kull, C. A., McCarthy, J. & Shrestha, K. (2010) From hope to crisis and back again? A critical history of the global CBNRM narrative. Environmental Conservation 37 (1): 515.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dressler, W. H. (2006) Co-opting conservation: migrant resource control and access to national park management in the Philippine uplands. Development and Change 37 (2): 401426.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Drew, J. A. (2005) Use of traditional ecological knowledge in marine conservation. Conservation Biology 19 (4): 12861293.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellen, R., Lycett, S. J. & Johns, S. E., eds. (2013) Understanding Cultural Transmission in Anthropology: A Critical Synthesis. New York, NY, USA: Berghahn Books.Google Scholar
Evans, L., Cherrett, N. & Pemsl, D. (2011) Assessing the impact of fisheries co-management interventions in developing countries: a meta-analysis. Journal of Environmental Management 92 (8): 19381949.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Foale, S., Cohen, P., Januchowski-Hartley, S., Wenger, A. & Macintyre, M. (2011) Tenure and taboos: origins and implications for fisheries in the Pacific. Fish and Fisheries 12 (4): 357369.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furusawa, T. (2009) Changing ethnobotanical knowledge of the Roviana people, Solomon Islands: quantitative approaches to its correlation with modernization. Human Ecology 37 (2): 147159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
García-Quijano, C. G. (2009) Managing complexity: ecological knowledge and success in Puerto Rican small-scale fisheries. Human Organization 68 (1): 117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gauld, R. (2000) Maintaining centralized control in community-based forestry: policy construction in the Philippines. Development and Change 31 (1): 229254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Golden, A. S., Naisilsisili, W., Ligairi, I. & Drew, J. A. (2014) Combining natural history collections with fisher knowledge for community-based conservation in Fiji. PLoS One 9 (5): e98036.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Govan, H., Tawake, A., Tabunakawai, K., Jenkins, A., Lasgorceix, A., Schwarz, A. M., Aalbersberg, B., Manele, B., Vieux, C. & Notere, D. (2009) Status and Potential of Locally-managed Marine Areas in the South Pacific: Meeting Nature Conservation and Sustainable Livelihood Targets through Wide-spread Implementation of LMMAs: Study Report. Suva, Fiji: PREP/WWF/WorldFish-Reefbase/CRISP.Google Scholar
Grant, S. & Berkes, F. (2007) Fisher knowledge as expert system: a case from the longline fishery of Grenada, the Eastern Caribbean. Fisheries Research 84 (2): 162170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hamilton, R. J., Almany, G. R., Stevens, D., Bode, M., Pita, J., Peterson, N. A. & Choat, J. H. (2016) Hyperstability masks declines in bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) populations. Coral Reefs 35 (3): 751763.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hviding, E. (1996) Guardians of Marovo Lagoon: Practice, Place, and Politics in Maritime Melanesia. Honolulu, HI, USA: University of Hawaii Press.Google Scholar
IPBES (2013) Report of the Second Session of the Plenary of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. Bonn, Germany: IPBES.Google Scholar
Iskandar, J. & Ellen, R. (2007) Innovation, ‘hybrid’ knowledge, and the conservation of relict rainforest in upland Banten. In: Modern Crises and Traditional Strategies: Local Ecological Knowledge in Island Southeast Asia, ed. Ellen, R., pp. 133142. Oxford, UK: Berghahn.Google Scholar
Janif, S. Z., Nunn, P. D., Geraghty, P., Aalbersberg, W., Thomas, F. R. & Camailakeba, M. (2016) Value of traditional oral narratives in building climate-change resilience: insights from rural communities in Fiji. Ecology and Society 21 (2): 10.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johannes, R. E. (1978) Traditional marine conservation methods in Oceania and their demise. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 9 (1): 349364.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johannes, R. E. (1981) Words of the Lagoon: Fishing and Marine Lore in the Palau District of Micronesia. Berkeley, CA, USA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Johannes, R. E. (2002) The renaissance of community-based marine resource management in Oceania. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 33: 317340.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johannes, R. E., Freeman, M. M. R. & Hamilton, R. J. (2000) Ignore fishers’ knowledge and miss the boat. Fish and Fisheries 1 (3): 257271.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jupiter, S. D., Cohen, P. J., Weeks, R., Tawake, A. & Govan, H. (2014) Locally-managed marine areas: multiple objectives and diverse strategies. Pacific Conservation Biology 20 (2): 165179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Keen, M. & Mahanty, S. (2006) Learning in sustainable natural resource management: challenges and opportunities in the Pacific. Society and Natural Resources 19 (6): 497513.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Keppel, G., Morrison, C., Meyer, J.-Y. & Boehmer, H. J. (2014) Isolated and vulnerable: the history and future of Pacific Island terrestrial biodiversity. Pacific Conservation Biology 20 (2): 136145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Keppel, G., Morrison, C., Watling, D., Tuiwawa, M. V. & Rounds, I. A. (2012) Conservation in tropical Pacific Island countries: why most current approaches are failing. Conservation Letters 5 (4): 256265.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kuper, A. (2003) The return of the native. Current Anthropology 44 (3): 389403.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lauer, M. (2012) Oral traditions or situated practices? Understanding how indigenous communities respond to environmental disasters. Human Organization 71 (2): 176187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lauer, M. & Aswani, S. (2009) Indigenous ecological knowledge as situated practices: understanding fishers’ knowledge in the western Solomon Islands. American Anthropologist 111 (3): 317329.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lauer, M. & Aswani, S. (2010) Indigenous knowledge and long-term ecological change: detection, interpretation, and responses to changing ecological conditions in Pacific Island communities. Environmental Management 45 (5): 985997.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lauer, M. & Matera, J. (2016) Who detects ecological change after catastrophic events? Indigenous knowledge, social networks, and situated practices. Human Ecology 44 (1): 3346.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lawson, S. (1996) Tradition versus Democracy in the South Pacific: Fiji, Tonga, and Western Samoa. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lazrus, H. (2015) Risk perception and climate adaptation in Tuvalu: a combined cultural theory and traditional knowledge approach. Human organization 74 (1): 5261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lebel, L., Anderies, J. M., Campbell, B., Folke, C., Hatfield-Dodds, S., Hughes, T. P., Wilson, J. & 2006. (2006) Governance and the capacity to manage resilience in regional social–ecological systems. Ecology and Society 11 (1): 19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lebot, V. & Simeoni, P. (2015) Community food security: resilience and vulnerability in Vanuatu. Human Ecology 43 (6): 827842.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leopold, M., Beckensteiner, J., Kaltavara, J., Raubani, J. & Caillon, S. (2013) Community-based management of near-shore fisheries in Vanuatu: what works? Marine Policy 42: 167176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Levine, A. & Sauafea-Le'au, F. (2013) Traditional knowledge, use, and management of living marine resources in American Samoa: documenting changes over time through interviews with elder fishers. Pacific Science 67 (3): 395407.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lévy-Bruhl, L. (1985 [1910]) How Natives Think. Princeton, NJ, USA: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Li, T. M. (2000) Articulating indigenous identity in Indonesia: resource politics and the tribal slot. Comparative Studies in Society and History 42 (1): 149179.Google Scholar
Majnep, I. S. & Bulmer, R. N. H. (1977) Birds of My Kalam Country. Auckland, New Zealand: Auckland University Press.Google Scholar
Malinowski, B. C. (1918) Fishing in the Trobriand Islands. Man 18: 8792.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCarter, J. & Gavin, M. C. (2014a) In situ maintenance of traditional ecological knowledge on Malekula Island, Vanuatu. Society & Natural Resources 27 (11): 11151129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCarter, J. & Gavin, M. C. (2014b) Local perceptions of changes in traditional ecological knowledge: a case study from Malekula Island, Vanuatu. Ambio 43 (3): 288296.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McCarter, J. & Gavin, M. C. (2015) Assessing variation and diversity of ethnomedical knowledge: a case study from Malekula Island, Vanuatu. Economic Botany 69 (3): 251261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McClanahan, T. R. & Cinner, J. E. (2012) Adapting to a Changing Environment: Confronting the Consequences of Climate Change. New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
McCubbin, S., Smit, B. & Pearce, T. (2015) Where does climate fit? Vulnerability to climate change in the context of multiple stressors in Funafuti, Tuvalu. Global Environmental Change 30: 4355.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McMillen, H., Ticktin, T. & Springer, H. K. (2017) The future is behind us: traditional ecological knowledge and resilience over time on Hawai'i Island. Regional Environmental Change 17 (2): 579592.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McMillen, H. L., Ticktin, T., Friedlander, A., Jupiter, S. D., Thaman, R., Campbell, J., Veitayaki, J., Giambelluca, T., Nihmei, S. & Rupeni, E. (2014) Small islands, valuable insights: systems of customary resource use and resilience to climate change in the Pacific. Ecology and Society 19 (4): 44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moller, H., O'Blyver, P., Bragg, C., Newman, J., Clucas, R., Fletcher, D., Kitson, J., McKechnie, S., Scott, D. & Body, Rakiura Titi Islands Administering (2009) Guidelines for cross-cultural participatory action research partnerships: a case study of a customary seabird harvest in New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Zoology 36 (3): 211241.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nadasdy, P. (1999) The politics of TEK: power and the “integration” of knowledge. Arctic Anthropology 36 (1–2): 118.Google Scholar
Pickering, A. (1995) The Mangle of Practice: Time, Agency, and Science. Chicago, IL, USA: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pollard, E. J. M., Thaman, R., Brodie, G. & Morrison, C. (2015) Threatened biodiversity and traditional ecological knowledge: associated beliefs, customs, and uses of herpetofauna among the ‘Are'Are on Malaita Island, Solomon Islands. Ethnobiology Letters 6 (1): 99110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Quimby, B. (2015) Emerging customs: small-scale fishing practices in Aceh, Indonesia. Applied Geography 59: 125130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rathwell, K., Armitage, D. & Berkes, F. (2015) Bridging knowledge systems to enhance governance of environmental commons: a typology of settings. International Journal of the Commons 9 (2): 851880.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Raymond, C. M., Fazey, I., Reed, M. S., Stringer, L. C., Robinson, G. M. & Evely, A. C. (2010) Integrating local and scientific knowledge for environmental management. Journal of Environmental Management 91 (8): 17661777.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Reyers, B., Nel, J. L., O'Farrell, P. J., Sitas, N. & Nel, D. C. (2015) Navigating complexity through knowledge coproduction: mainstreaming ecosystem services into disaster risk reduction. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 112 (24): 73627368.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Robinson, J., Cinner, J. E. & Graham, N. A. J. (2014) The influence of fisher knowledge on the susceptibility of reef fish aggregations to fishing. PLoS One 9 (3): e91296.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ruddle, K. (1998) The context of policy design for existing community-based fisheries management systems in the Pacific Islands. Ocean & Coastal Management 40 (2–3): 105126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ruddle, K. (2008) Introduction to the collected works of R.E. Johannes, publications on marine traditional knowledge and management. SPC Traditional Marine Resource Management and Knowledge Information Bulletin 23: 1324.Google Scholar
Ruddle, K. & Akimichi, T., eds. (1984) Introduction in Maritime Institutions in the Western Pacific. Osaka, Japan: National Museum of Ethnoglogy (Senri Ethnological Studies).Google Scholar
Rudiak-Gould, P. (2013) Climate Change and Tradition in a Small Island State: The Rising Tide. New York, NY, USA: Routledge.Google Scholar
Rumbach, A. & Foley, D. (2014) Indigenous institutions and their role in disaster risk reduction and resilience: evidence from the 2009 tsunami in American Samoa. Ecology and Society 19 (1): 9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schuttenberg, H. Z. & Guth, H. K. (2015) Seeking our shared wisdom: a framework for understanding knowledge coproduction and coproductive capacities. Ecology and Society 20 (1): 11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scoones, I. (1999) New ecology and the social sciences: what prospects for a fruitful engagement? Annual Review of Anthropology 28: 479507.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Silvertown, J. (2009) A new dawn for citizen science. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 24 (9): 467471.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
South, G. R., Goulet, D., Tuqiri, S. & Church, M., eds. (1994) Traditional Marine Tenure and Sustainable Management of Marine Resources in Asia and the Pacific. Suva, Fiji: International Ocean Institute – South Pacific.Google Scholar
Spalding, M. D. & Brown, B. E. (2015) Warm-water coral reefs and climate change. Science 350 (6262): 769771.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sujarwo, W., Arinasa, I. B. K., Salomone, F., Caneva, G. & Fattorini, S. (2014) Cultural erosion of Balinese indigenous knowledge of food and nutraceutical plants. Economic Botany 68 (4): 426437.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tengö, M., Brondizio, E. S., Elmqvist, T., Malmer, P. & Spierenburg, M. (2014) Connecting diverse knowledge systems for enhanced ecosystem governance: the multiple evidence base approach. Ambio 43 (5): 579591.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thaman, R., Lyver, P., Mpande, R., Perez, E., Cariño, J. & Takeuchi, K. (2013) The Contribution of Indigenous and Local Knowledge Systems to IPBES: Building Synergies with Science. IPBES Expert Meeting Report, UNESCO/UNU. Paris, France: UNESCO.Google Scholar
Thaman, R. R. (2005) Trees outside forests as a foundation for sustainable development in the small island developing states of the Pacific Ocean. International Forestry Review 4 (4): 268276.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thorburn, C. (2001) The house that poison built: customary marine property rights and the live food fish trade in the Kei Islands, southeast Maluku. Development and Change 32 (1): 151180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Turnbull, D. (2000) Masons, Tricksters and Cartographers: Comparative Studies in the Sociology of Scientific and Indigenous Knowledge. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Harwood Academic.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Turnbull, D. (2009) Futures for indigenous knowledges. Futures 41 (1): 15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Turner, R. A., Cakacaka, A., Graham, N. A. J., Polunin, N. V. C., Pratchett, M. S., Stead, S. M. & Wilson, S. K. (2007) Declining reliance on marine resources in remote South Pacific societies: ecological versus socio-economic drivers. Coral Reefs 26 (4): 9971008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Turnhout, E., Bloomfield, B., Hulme, M., Vogel, J. & Wynne, B. (2012) Listen to the voices of experience. Nature 488 (7412): 454455.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Walker, B. L. E. & Robinson, M. A. (2009) Economic development, marine protected areas and gendered access to fishing resources in a Polynesian lagoon. Gender, Place and Culture 16 (4): 467484.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wenger, E. (1998) Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wenger, E., McDermott, R. A. & Snyder, W. (2002) Cultivating Communities of Practice: A Guide to Managing Knowledge. Boston, MA, USA: Harvard Business Press.Google Scholar
Zent, S. (2013) The processural perspectives on traditional environmental knowledge: continuity, erosion, transformation, innovation. In: Understanding Cultural Transmission in Anthropology: A Critical Synthesis, eds. Ellen, R., Lycett, S. J. & Johns, S. E., pp. 213265. New York, NY, USA: Berghahn Books.Google Scholar
15
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Changing understandings of local knowledge in island environments
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Changing understandings of local knowledge in island environments
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Changing understandings of local knowledge in island environments
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *