Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-w6vhv Total loading time: 0.174 Render date: 2022-11-29T12:37:15.458Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Use of Geobotanical Maps and Automated Mapping Techniques to Examine Cumulative Impacts in the Prudhoe Bay Oilfield, Alaska

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 August 2009

Donald A. Walker
Affiliation:
Research Associate, Institute of Arctic & Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309
Patrick J. Webber
Affiliation:
Professor, Institute of Arctic & Alpine Research and Department of Environmental, Population & Organismic Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309
Marilyn D. Walker
Affiliation:
Graduate Research Assistant, Institute of Arctic & Alpine Research and Department of Environmental, Population & Organismic Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309
Nancy D. Lederer
Affiliation:
Professional Research Assistant, Institute of Arctic & Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309
Rosa H. Meehan
Affiliation:
Graduate Research Assistant, Institute of Arctic & Alpine Research and Department of Environmental, Population & Organismic Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309; also U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Special Studies, 1011 E. Tudor Avenue, Anchorage, Alaska 99503
Earl A. Nordstrand
Affiliation:
North Slope Borough GIS, 508 W. 2nd Street, Room 310, Anchorage, Alaska 99501, USA.

Extract

A comprehensive approach to the problem of examining impacts on tundra landscapes is presented, using the Prudhoe Bay oilfield as a model. Development of the oilfield is documented, utilizing a series of ‘historical’ disturbance maps for the period 1949–83. Cumulative development of the entire field was mapped at a scale of 1:24,000, and an intensely developed portion of the field was mapped at 1:6,000, using an integrated geobotanical and historical disturbance map (IGHDM). The IGHDM data were automated, and a series of maps was made which depict a variety of information—including geobotany of the area as of 1949, and the historical sequence of development from 1968 to 1983.

Type
Main Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Foundation for Environmental Conservation 1986

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Council on Environmental Quality (1978). National Environmental Policy Act, Implementation of Procedural Provisions; Final Regulations. Federal Register, 43, pp. 55978–6005.Google Scholar
Dangermond, J., Derrenbacher, W. & Harden, E. (1982). Description of Techniques for Automation of Regional Resource Resource Inventories. Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc., 380 New York Street, Redlands, California, USA: 52 pp., illustr. (mimeogr.).Google Scholar
Everett, K.R., Walker, D.A. & Webber, P.J. (1981). Prudhoe Bay Oilfield Geobotanical Master Map: Scale 1:6,000. SOHIO Alaska Petroleum Company, 3111 C Street, Pouch 6–612, Anchorage, Alaska 99502, USA: 23 map sheets.Google Scholar
Horak, G.C., Vlachos, E.C. & Cline, E.W. (1983). Fish and Wildlife and Cumulative Impacts: Is There a Problem? Prepared by Dynamac Corporation, Enviro Control Division, Fort Collins, Colorado 80521, under Contract No. 14-16-0009-81-058 for US Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Eastern Energy and Land Use Team, Route 3, Box 44, Kearneysville, West Virginia 25430, USA: 24 pp., illustr.Google Scholar
Soil Survey Staff (1975). Soil Taxonomy: A Basic System of Soil Classification for Making and Interpreting Soil Surveys. (Agriculture Handbook No 436.) US Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, vi + 754 pp.Google Scholar
Troy, D.M., Herter, D.R. & Burgess, R.M. (1982). Prudhoe Bay waterflood environmental monitoring project: tundra bird monitoring program. Pp. xvi + 7–1 to 780 in Final Report, Prudhoe Bay Waterflood Project Environmental Monitoring Program 1982. US Army Corps of Engineers, Alaska District, PO Box 7002, Anchorage, Alaska 99501, USA: 389 pp., illustr.Google Scholar
Walker, D.A. (1983). A hierarchical tundra vegetation classification especially designed for mapping in northern Alaska. Pp. 1332–7 in Permafrost: Fourth International Conference, Proceedings, 17–22 July 1983, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska. National Academy Press, Washington, DC, USA: xxv + 1524 pp.Google Scholar
Walker, D.A., Everett, K.R., Webber, P.J. & Brown, J. (1980). Geobotanical Atlas of the Prudhoe Bay Region, Alaska. Report No. 80–14, US Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Road, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755, USA: iii + 69 pp., illustr.Google Scholar
Walker, D.A., Everett, K.R. & Webber, P.J. (1983). Geobotany. Chapter 2 in Prudhoe Bay Unit–Eileen West End Environmental Studies Program, Summer 1982 (Ed. Troy, D.M.). Prepared by LGL Alaska Research Associates, Inc., Fairbanks, Alaska, for Sohio Alaska Petroleum Comapny, 3111 C Street, Pouch 6–612, Anchorage, Alaska 99502, USA: 77 pp.Google Scholar
Washburn, A.L. (1980). Geocryology, a Survey of Periglacial Processes and Environments. John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY, USA: ix + 406 pp., illustr.Google Scholar
Webber, P.J. & Ives, J.D. (1978). Damage and recovery of tundra vegetation. Environmental Conservation, 5 (3), pp. 171–82, 6 figs.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
22
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Use of Geobotanical Maps and Automated Mapping Techniques to Examine Cumulative Impacts in the Prudhoe Bay Oilfield, Alaska
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Use of Geobotanical Maps and Automated Mapping Techniques to Examine Cumulative Impacts in the Prudhoe Bay Oilfield, Alaska
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Use of Geobotanical Maps and Automated Mapping Techniques to Examine Cumulative Impacts in the Prudhoe Bay Oilfield, Alaska
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *