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Alcohol misuse and illicit drug use are associated with HCV/HIV co-infection

  • D. SIMON (a1), R. T. MICHITA (a1), J. U. BÉRIA (a2) (a3), D. C. TIETZMANN (a4), A. T. STEIN (a2) (a3) (a4) and V. R. LUNGE (a1)...

Summary

We studied hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence and risk factors for HCV infection in a sample of Brazilian HIV-positive patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 580 HIV-positive patients from a specialized HIV/AIDS diagnosis and treatment centre in southern Brazil. All patients were interviewed for socio-demographic and risk factors and tested for HCV antibodies and HCV-RNA detection. A multivariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors for HCV infection. A total of 138 (24%) patients had past or chronic hepatitis C. The following risk factors were associated with HCV infection for each gender: alcohol misuse and injecting drug use in women (P < 0·001) and low educational level, smoking drug use, and injecting drug use in men (P < 0·01). These results suggest that alcohol misuse, low educational level, smoking drug use, and injecting drug use are probable risk factors for HCV infection in HIV-positive patients. This information contributes to an understanding of the epidemiology of HIV/HCV co-infection in Brazil.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr V. R. Lunge, PPG Biologia Celular e Molecular Aplicada à Saúde, Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Av. Farroupilha, 8001 – Prédio 22–3° andar, 92425-900 Canoas, RS, Brazil. (Email: vagner.lunge@gmail.com)

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Keywords

Alcohol misuse and illicit drug use are associated with HCV/HIV co-infection

  • D. SIMON (a1), R. T. MICHITA (a1), J. U. BÉRIA (a2) (a3), D. C. TIETZMANN (a4), A. T. STEIN (a2) (a3) (a4) and V. R. LUNGE (a1)...

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