Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5959bf8d4d-2rjgt Total loading time: 0.199 Render date: 2022-12-07T16:02:10.114Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Cohort study of serum total cholesterol and in-hospital incidence of infectious diseases

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 October 1998

C. IRIBARREN
Affiliation:
Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, Oakland, CA, USA
D. R. JACOBS
Affiliation:
Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA
S. SIDNEY
Affiliation:
Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, Oakland, CA, USA
A. J. CLAXTON
Affiliation:
Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA
K. R. FEINGOLD
Affiliation:
Metabolism Section (111F), Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

A multiethnic cohort of adult members of the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program (55300 men and 65271 women) was followed for 15 years (1979–93) to assess the association between total cholesterol and risk of infections (other than respiratory and HIV) diagnosed in the in-patient setting. Using multivariate Cox regression, total cholesterol was inversely and significantly related to urinary tract, venereal, musculo-skeletal, and all infections among men; and to urinary tract, all genito-urinary, septicaemia or bacteraemia, miscellaneous viral site unspecified, and all infections among women. The reduction of risk of all infections associated with a 1 s.d. increase in total cholesterol was 8% in both men (95% CI, 4–12%) and women (95% CI, 5–11%). For urinary tract infections among men, as for septicaemia or bacteraemia and nervous system infections among women, the risk relation was restricted to persons aged 55–89 years. Nervous system infections were positively related to total cholesterol among women aged 25–54. In both genders, the significant inverse association with all infections persisted after excluding the first 5 years of follow-up. Collectively, these data are suggestive of an inverse association, although not entirely consistent, between total cholesterol and incidence of infections either requiring hospitalization or acquired in the hospital. Further research is needed to elucidate whether these associations are biologically plausible or represent uncontrolled confounding by unmeasured risk factors.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1998 Cambridge University Press
You have Access
56
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Cohort study of serum total cholesterol and in-hospital incidence of infectious diseases
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Cohort study of serum total cholesterol and in-hospital incidence of infectious diseases
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Cohort study of serum total cholesterol and in-hospital incidence of infectious diseases
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *