Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-wdwc2 Total loading time: 0.363 Render date: 2022-01-25T11:27:22.210Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Cross-reactions of immunoglobulin M and G antibodies with enterovirus-specific viral structural proteins

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2009

F. Reigel
Affiliation:
Institute of Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, University of Berne, Friedbühlstrasse 51, 3010 Berne, Switzerland
F. Burkhardt
Affiliation:
Institute of Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, University of Berne, Friedbühlstrasse 51, 3010 Berne, Switzerland
U. Schilt
Affiliation:
Institute of Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, University of Berne, Friedbühlstrasse 51, 3010 Berne, Switzerland
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Summary

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

We analysed the reactivity of enterovirus-specific human IgM and IgG antibodies with the structural proteins of different enteroviruses by the immunoblot technique. In general, all immunoglobulin G antibodies of the tested sera reacted with capsid polypeptide VP 1 of the viruses tested (echoviruses 9 and 11, coxsackievirus B3 and poliovirus 2). In contrast, enterovirus specific immunoglobulin M antibodies of adults reacted with capsid polypeptides VP 1, VP 2, and/or VP 3 of the viruses mentioned above. The reactions with VP 2 and/or VP 3 were often stronger than with VP 1. IgM antibodies from sera of newborns infected by echovirus 11 reacted with VP 1 and VP 2/3 of echovirus 11 and also with VP 2 and VP 3 of poliovirus 2. Preabsorption experiments indicate that cross-reactive IgG antibodies react with epitopes of VP 1 not present on the surface of intact virus particles. The results from the immunoblot technique were compared to data from microneutralization tests and M-antibody capture radioimmunoassays.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1985

References

Bittle, J. L., Houghten, R. A., Alexander, H., Shinnick, T. M., Sutflifte, J. G., Lerner, R. A., Rowlands, D. J. & Brown, F. (1982). Protection against foot-and-mouth disease by immunization with a chemically synthesized peptide predicted from the viral nucleotide sequence. Nature (London) 298, 3033.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Burkhardt, F., Reigel, F. & Schilt, U. (1983). Sinnvolle virologische Abklärungen bei Meningitisverdacht: Prüfung eines Radioimmuntestes zum Nachweis von IgM Antikpern gegen ECHO 9- and ECHO-11. Viren. Schweizcrische Medizinische Wochenschrift 113, 902909.Google Scholar
Bussell, R. H., Karzon, D. T., Barron, A. L. & Hall, F. T. (1902). Hemagglutination inhibiting, complement-fixing and neutralizing antibody responses in ECHO 6 infections, including studies on heterotypic responses. Journal of Immunology 88, 4754.Google Scholar
Dörries, R. & Ter Meulen, V. (1983). Specificity of IgM antibodies in acute human coxsackie virus B infections, analyzed by indirect solid phase enzyme immunoassay and immunoblot technique. Journal of General Virology 64, 159167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
El-Hagrassy, M. M. O., Banatvala, J. E. & Coltart, D. J. (1980). Coxsackie-B-virus-specific IgM responses in patients with cardiac and other diseases. Lancet ii, 11601162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Emini, E. A., Jameson, B. A. & Wimmer, E. (1983). Priming for and induction ofanti-poliovirus neutralizing antibodies by synthetic peptides. Nature (London) 304, 699703.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Emini, E. A., Ostapchck, Pr. & Wimmer, E. (1983). Bivalent attachment of antibody onto poliovirus leads to conformational alteration and neutralization. Journal of Virology 48, 547550.Google ScholarPubMed
Evans, D. M. A., Minor, P. D., Schild, G. S. & Almond, J. W. (1983). Critical role of an eight-amino acid sequence of VP 1 in neutralization of poliovirus type 3. Nature (London) 304, 459462.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Flehmig, F. (1978). Laboratoriumsdiagnose der Hepatitis A-Infektion. Bundeagemndheitsblatt 21, 277.Google Scholar
Halonen, P., Rosen, L. & Huehner, R. J. (1959). Homologous and heterologous complement fixing antibody in persons infected with ECHO.eoxsaekieand poliomyelitis viruses. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Iiiology and Medicine 101, 230241.Google ScholarPubMed
Haresnape, J. M. & McCaiion, D. (1983). Four independent antigenic determinants on the capsid polypeptides of aphthovirus. Journal of General Virology 64, 23452355.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hasegawa, A. & Inoitye, S. (1983). Type-specific and cross-reactive antigenicity of capsid proteins VP 1 and VP 2 of echovirus type 7. Microbiology and Immunology 27, 869870.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Katze, M. G. & Chowell, R. L. (1980a). Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of coxsaekie virus group Ii antibodies. Journal of General Virology 48, 225229.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Katze, M. G. & Crowell, R. L. (1980b). Immunological studies of the group B coxsackieviruses by the sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoprecipitation. Journal of General Virology 50, 357367.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
King, M. L., Bidwell, D., Shaikh, A., Voller, A. & Banatvala, J. E. (1983). Coxsackie-B-virus-specific IgM responses in children with insulin-dependent (Juvenile-onset) type I diabetes mellitus. Lancet i, 13971399).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kraft, L. M. & Melnick, J. L. (1952). Complement fixation tests with homologous and heterologous types of coxsackie virus in man. Journal of Immunology 68, 680685.Google ScholarPubMed
Laemmli, U. K. (1970). Cleavage of structural proteins during the assembly of the head of bacteriophage T4. Nature (London) 227, 680685.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mertens, Th., Pika, U. & Eggers, H. J. (1983). Cross antigenicity among enteroviruses as revealed by immunoblot technique. Virology 129, 431442.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Minor, T. E., Heistrom, P. B., Nelson, D. B. & Alessio, D. J. (1979). Counterimmunoeleetrophoresis test for immunoglobulin M antibodies to group B coxsackieviruses. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 9. 503506.Google Scholar
Morqan-Capner, P. & Mcsorley, C. (1983). Antibody capture radioimmunoassay (MACRIA) for coxsackieviruses B4 and B5-specific IgM. Journal of Hygiene 90, 333349.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pattison, J. R. (1983). Test for coxsackie B virus specific IgM. Journal of Hygiene 90, 327332.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reigel, F., Burkhardt, F. & Schilt, U. (1984). Reaction pattern of immunoglobulin M and G antibodies to echovirus 11 structural proteins. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 19, 870874.Google Scholar
Robertson, B. H., Moore, D. M., Grubman, M. J. & Kleid, D. G. (1983). Identification of an exposed region of the immunogenic capsid polypeptide VP 1 on foot-and-mouth disease virus. Journal of Virology 46, 311316.Google ScholarPubMed
Rosenwirth, B. & Eggers, H. J. (1982). Biochemistry and pathogenicity of echovirus 9. Virology 123, 102112.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rotbart, H. A., Levin, M. J. & Villarreal, L. P. (1984). Use of subgenomic poliovirus DNA hybridization probes to detect the major subgroups of enteroviruses. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 20, 11051108.Google ScholarPubMed
Schilt, U. (1977). Detection of specific IgM neutralizing antibodies in naturally acquired sporadic human enterovirus infections. Experientia 33, 133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmidt, N. J., Dennis, J., Frommhagen, L. H. & Lennette, E. H. (1962a). Serologic reactivity of certain antigens obtained by fractionation of coxsackie viruses in cesium chloride density gradients. Journal of Immunology 90, 654662.Google Scholar
Schmidt, N. J., Dennis, J. & Lennette, E. H. (1962b). Complement-fixing antibody responses to ECHO virus types 12 and 19 of patients with enterovirus infections. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 109, 364369.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmidt, N. J., Magofkin, R. L. & Lennette, E. H. (1973). Association of group B coxsackieviruses with cases of pericarditis, myocarditis, or pleurodynia by demonstration of immunoglobulin M antibody. Infection and Immunity 8, 341348.Google ScholarPubMed
Thorpe, R., Minor, P. D., McKay, A., Schild, G. C. & Spitz, M. (1983). Immunochemical studies of polioviruses: identification of immunoreactive virus capsid polypeptides. Journal of General Virology 63, 487492.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Torfason, E. G., Frisk, G. & Diderholm, H. (1984). Indirect and reverse radioimmunoassays and their apparent specificities in the detection of antibodies to enteroviruses in human sera. Journal of Medical Virology 13, 1331.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Towbin, H., Staeheun, T. & Gordon, J. (1979). Electrophoretic transfer of proteins from polyacrylamide gels to nitrocellulose sheets: procedure and some applications. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (U.S.A.) 76, 43504354.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Weintraub, H., Palter, K. & Van Lente, F. (1975). Histories H2a, H2b, H3 and H4 form a tetrameric complex in solution of high salt. Cell 6, 85110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wyc iowski, C., van der Werf, S., Siffert, O., Crainic, R., Bruneau, P. & Girard, M. (1983). A poliovirus type 1 neutralizing epitope is located within amino acid residues 93 to 104 of viral capsid polypeptide VP 1. EMBO Journal 11, 20192024.Google Scholar
You have Access
9
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Cross-reactions of immunoglobulin M and G antibodies with enterovirus-specific viral structural proteins
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Cross-reactions of immunoglobulin M and G antibodies with enterovirus-specific viral structural proteins
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Cross-reactions of immunoglobulin M and G antibodies with enterovirus-specific viral structural proteins
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *