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Description and validation of a new automated surveillance system for Clostridium difficile in Denmark

  • M. CHAINE (a1), S. GUBBELS (a1), M. VOLDSTEDLUND (a1), B. KRISTENSEN (a1), J. NIELSEN (a1), L. P. ANDERSEN (a2), S. ELLERMANN-ERIKSEN (a3), J. ENGBERG (a4), A. HOLM (a5), B. OLESEN (a6), H.C. SCHØNHEYDER (a7) (a8), C. ØSTERGAARD (a9), S. ETHELBERG (a1) and K. MØLBAK (a10)...

Summary

The surveillance of Clostridium difficile (CD) in Denmark consists of laboratory based data from Departments of Clinical Microbiology (DCMs) sent to the National Registry of Enteric Pathogens (NREP). We validated a new surveillance system for CD based on the Danish Microbiology Database (MiBa). MiBa automatically collects microbiological test results from all Danish DCMs. We built an algorithm to identify positive test results for CD recorded in MiBa. A CD case was defined as a person with a positive culture for CD or PCR detection of toxin A and/or B and/or binary toxin. We compared CD cases identified through the MiBa-based surveillance with those reported to NREP and locally in five DCMs representing different Danish regions. During 2010–2014, NREP reported 13 896 CD cases, and the MiBa-based surveillance 21 252 CD cases. There was a 99·9% concordance between the local datasets and the MiBa-based surveillance. Surveillance based on MiBa was superior to the current surveillance system, and the findings show that the number of CD cases in Denmark hitherto has been under-reported. There were only minor differences between local data and the MiBa-based surveillance, showing the completeness and validity of CD data in MiBa. This nationwide electronic system can greatly strengthen surveillance and research in various applications.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: M. Chaine, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Prevention, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. (Email: manc@ssi.dk)

References

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