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Descriptive epidemiology of rotavirus infection in a community in North India

  • T. R. CHANDOLA (a1), S. TANEJA (a1), N. GOYAL (a1), S. S. RATHORE (a1), M. B. APPAIAHGARI (a2), A. MISHRA (a2), S. SINGH (a1), S. VRATI (a2) (a3) and N. BHANDARI (a1)...

Summary

In India, rotavirus infections cause the death of 98621 children each year. In urban neighbourhoods in Delhi, children were followed up for 1 year to estimate the incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis and common genotypes. Infants aged ⩽1 week were enrolled in cohort 1 and infants aged 12 months (up to +14 days) in cohort 2. Fourteen percent (30/210) gastroenteritis episodes were positive for rotavirus. Incidence rates of rotavirus gastroenteritis episodes in the first and second year were 0·18 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·10–0·27] and 0·14 (95% CI 0·07–0·21) episodes/child-year, respectively. The incidence rate of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in the first year of life was 0·05 (95% CI 0·01–0·10) episodes/child-year. There were no cases in the second year. The common genotypes detected were G1P[8] (27%) and G9P[4] (23%). That severe rotavirus gastroenteritis is common in the first year of life is relevant for planning efficacy trials.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr N. Bhandari, Centre for Health Research and Development, Society for Applied Studies, 45, Kalu Sarai, New Delhi-110016, India. (Email: CHRD@sas.org.in)

References

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Descriptive epidemiology of rotavirus infection in a community in North India

  • T. R. CHANDOLA (a1), S. TANEJA (a1), N. GOYAL (a1), S. S. RATHORE (a1), M. B. APPAIAHGARI (a2), A. MISHRA (a2), S. SINGH (a1), S. VRATI (a2) (a3) and N. BHANDARI (a1)...

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