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Discontinuation of contact precautions with the introduction of universal daily chlorhexidine bathing

  • J. A. MCKINNELL (a1) (a2) (a3), S. J. EELLS (a2) (a4) (a5), E. CLARK (a1), D. D. RAND (a1), G. T. KIET (a1), R. MACIAS-GIL (a2), J. M. MENDEZ (a2) (a3), S. S. HUANG (a6), E. N. MILEFCHIK (a1) and L. G. MILLER (a2) (a3)...

Summary

Contact precautions are a traditional strategy to prevent transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Chlorhexidine bathing is increasingly used to decrease MRSA burden and transmission in intensive care units (ICUs). We sought to evaluate a hospital policy change from routine contact precautions for MRSA compared with universal chlorhexidine bathing, without contact precautions. We measured new MRSA acquisition in ICU patients and surveyed for MRSA environmental contamination in common areas and non-MRSA patient rooms before and after the policy change. During the baseline and chlorhexidine bathing periods, the number of patients (453 vs. 417), ICU days (1999 vs. 1703) and MRSA days/1000 ICU days (109 vs. 102) were similar. MRSA acquisition (2/453 vs. 2/457, P = 0·93) and environmental MRSA contamination (9/474 vs. 7/500, P = 0·53) were not significantly different between time periods. There were 58% fewer contact precaution days in the ICU during the chlorhexidine period (241/1993 vs. 102/1730, P < 0·01). We found no evidence that discontinuation of contact precautions for patients with MRSA in conjunction with adoption of daily chlorhexidine bathing in ICUs is associated with increased MRSA acquisition among ICU patients or increased MRSA contamination of ICU fomites. Although underpowered, our findings suggest this strategy, which has the potential to reduce costs and improve patient safety, should be assessed in similar but larger studies.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: J. A. McKinnell, 1000 West Carson Street, Box 466, Torrance, CA, USA. (Email: Dr.McKinnell@gmail.com)

References

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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
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