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Effect of temperature, relative humidity and rainfall on rotavirus infections in Kolkata, India

  • A. SUMI (a1), K. RAJENDRAN (a2), T. RAMAMURTHY (a2), T. KRISHNAN (a2), G. B. NAIR (a2), K. HARIGANE (a3) and N. KOBAYASHI (a1)...

Summary

Rotavirus is a common viral cause of severe diarrhoea. For the underlying cause of rotavirus seasonality, the meteorological factor has been suspected, whereas quantitative correlation between seasonality and meteorological factor has not been fully investigated. In this study, we investigated the correlation of temporal patterns of the isolation rate of rotavirus with meteorological condition (temperature, relative humidity, rainfall) in Kolkata, India. We used time-series analysis combined with spectral analysis and least squares method. A 1-year cycle explained underlying variations of rotavirus and meteorological data. The 1-year cycle for rotavirus data was correlated with an opposite phase to that for meteorological data. Relatively high temperature could be associated with a low value of isolation rate of rotavirus in the monsoon season. Quantifying a correlation of rotavirus infections with meteorological conditions might prove useful in predicting rotavirus epidemics and health services could plan accordingly.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr A. Sumi, Department of Hygiene, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, S-1, W-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo, 060-8556, Japan. (Email: sumi@sapmed.ac.jp)

References

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