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Epidemiology of hospital admissions for paediatric varicella infections: a one-year prospective survey in the pre-vaccine era

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 June 2006

F. DUBOS
Affiliation:
Paediatric Emergency Department, Jeanne de Flandre University Hospital, Lille, France Lille-2 University, Lille, France
B. GRANDBASTIEN
Affiliation:
Lille-2 University, Lille, France Clinical Epidemiology Department, Calmette University Hospital, Lille, France
V. HUE
Affiliation:
Paediatric Emergency Department, Jeanne de Flandre University Hospital, Lille, France
A. MARTINOT
Affiliation:
Paediatric Emergency Department, Jeanne de Flandre University Hospital, Lille, France Lille-2 University, Lille, France
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Abstract

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To evaluate the epidemiology of hospital admissions for varicella in children, a 1-year prospective multicentre study was done in Northern France in the pre-varicella vaccine era. The 405 children aged <16 years seen at local hospitals for varicella or herpes zoster were included. Among them, 143 who had varicella and resided in the district were admitted. Admission incidence rates were 28/100000 children aged <16 years (149/100000 infants aged <1 year, 69/100000 children aged 1–4 years, and 2/100000 children aged 5–15 years). Most admissions (57%) were related to complications, usually skin infection (47%). Independent risk factors for admission were place of residence outside the district [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 8·7], complication at admission (aOR 5·8), recurrent fever (aOR 4·5), recent varicella in a sibling (aOR 4·0), and previous physician visit for the same condition (aOR 2·0).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2006 Cambridge University Press
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