Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Experimental studies on the infectivity of non-culturable forms of Campylobacter spp. in chicks and mice

  • A. W. Van De Giessen (a1), C. J. Heuvelman (a1), T. Abee (a2) and W. C. Hazeleger (a2)

Summary

The significance of non-culturable forms of Campylobacter spp., especially with regard to the epidemiology of this organism in poultry flocks, was explored. Two different experiments were conducted to produce non-culturable Campylobacter spp. and test their ability to colonize the animal gut. In the first experiment a mixture of 28 different strains of Campylobacter spp. from various sources was inoculated in both sterilized surface water and potassium phosphate buffer and stored at 4 °C. After Campylobacter spp. were no longer detectable by culture in the microcosms, the mixtures of non-culturable cells were used to challenge both chicks and mice. Recovery of non-culturable Campylobacter spp. from the animals was not successful at 4 weeks after administration. In the second experiment the survival of six individual strains of Campylobacter spp. in sterilized surface water at 4 °C was studied and the resulting non-culturable cells were used to challenge chicks. None of the Campylobacter strains could be recovered from the chicks at 2 weeks after administration. We conclude that occurrence of non-culturable forms of Campylobacter spp. capable of colonizing chicks is not a common phenomenon and that non-culturable forms of Campylobacter spp. are likely to be insignificant for importantly to the epidemiology of the organism in Dutch broiler flocks.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Experimental studies on the infectivity of non-culturable forms of Campylobacter spp. in chicks and mice
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Experimental studies on the infectivity of non-culturable forms of Campylobacter spp. in chicks and mice
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Experimental studies on the infectivity of non-culturable forms of Campylobacter spp. in chicks and mice
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence.

References

Hide All
1.Oosterom, J, Den Uyl, CH, Bänffer, JRJ, Huisman, J. Epidemiological investigations on Campylobacter jejuni in households with a primary infection. J Hyg 1984; 92: 325–32.
2.Kapperud, G, Skjerve, E, Bean, NH, Ostroff, SM, Lassen, J. Risk factors for sporadic Campylobacter infections: results of a case control study in southeastern Norway. J Clin Microbiol 1992; 30: 3117–21.
3.Tauxe, RV. 1992. Epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni infections in the United States and other industrialized nations. In: Nachamkin, I, Blaser, MJ, Tompkins, LS, eds. Campylobacter jejuni current status and future trends. Washington: American Society for Microbiology, 1992: 919.
4.Report on a WHO consultation on epidemiology and control of campylobacteriosis. Geneva: World Health Organization, 1994; Report no. WHO/CDS/VPH/ 94.135.
5.Giessen, A van de, Mazurier, S-I, Jacobs-Reitsma, W, Jansen, W, Berkers, P, Ritmeester, W, Wernars, K. Study on the epidemiology and control of Campylobacter jejuni in poultry broiler flocks. Appl Environ Microbiol 1992; 58: 1913–7.
6.Pearson, AD, Greenwood, M, Healing, TD. Colonization of broiler chickens by waterborne Campylobacter jejuni. Appl Environ Microbiol 1993; 59: 987–96.
7.Humphrey, TJ, Henley, A, Lanning, DG. The colonization of broiler chickens with Campylobacter jejuni: some epidemiological investigations. Epidemiol Infect 1993; 110: 601–7.
8.Jacobs-Reitsma, WF, van de Giessen, AW, Bolder, NM, Mulder, RWAW. Epidemiology of Campylobacter spp. at two Dutch broiler farms. Epidemiol Infect 1995; 114: 413–21.
9.Blaser, MJ, Taylor, DN, Feldman, RA. Epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni infections. Epidemiol Rev 1983; 5: 157–75.
10.Kapperud, G, Skjerve, E, Vik, L et al. , Epidemiological investigation of risk factors for Campylobacter colonization in Norwegian broiler flocks. Epidemiol Infect 1993; 111: 245–55.
11.Doyle, MP, Roman, DJ. Growth and survival of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni as a function of temperature and pH. J Food Protect 1981; 44: 596601.
12.Doyle, MP, Roman, DJ. Sensitivity of Campylobacter jejuni to drying. J Food Protect 1982; 45: 507–10.
13.McKay, AM. Viable but non-culturable forms of potentially pathogenic bacteria in water. Lett Appl Microbiol 1992; 14: 129–35.
14.Colwell, RR, Brayton, PR, Grimes, DJ, Roszak, DB, Huq, SA, Palmer, LM. Viable but non-culturable Vibrio cholerae and related pathogens in the environment: implications for release of genetically engineered microorganisms. Biotechnol 1985; 3: 817–20.
15.Grimes, DJ, Colwell, RR. Viability and virulence of Escherichia coli suspended by membrane chamber in semitropical ocean water. FEMS Microbiol Lett 1986; 34: 161–5.
16.Rollins, DM, Colwell, RR. Viable, non-culturable stage of Campylobacter jejuni and its role in survival in the natural aquatic environment. Appl Environ Microbiol 1986; 52: 531–8.
17.Medema, GJ, Schets, FM, van de Giessen, AW, Havelaar, AH. Lack of colonization of 1 day old chicks by viable, non-culturable Campylobacter jejuni. J Appl Bacteriol 1992; 72: 512–6.
18.Fearnley, C, Ayling, RD, Newell, DG. The failure of viable but non-culturable Campylobacter jejuni to colonise the chick model. In: Report on a WHO consultation on epidemiology and control of campylobacteriosis. Geneva: World Health Organization, 1994; Report no. WHO/CDS/VPH/94.135: 85–8.
19.Beumer, RR, de Vries, J, Rombouts, FM. Campylobacter jejuni non-culturable coccoid cells. Int J Food Microbiol 1992; 15: 153–63.
20.Jones, DM, Sutcliffe, EM, Curry, A. Recovery of viable but nonculturable Campylobacter jejuni. J Gen Microbiol 1991; 137: 2477–82.
21.Saha, SK, Saha, S, Sanyal, SC. Recovery of injured Campylobacter jejuni cells after animal passage. Appl Environ Microbiol 1991; 57: 3388–9.
22.Stern, NJ, Jones, DM, Wesley, IV, Rollins, DM. Colonization of chicks by non-culturable Campylobacter spp. Lett Appl Microbiol 1994; 18: 333–6.
23.Hazeleger, WC, Janse, JD, Koenraad, PMFJ, Beumer, RR, Rombouts, FM, Abee, T. Temperature-dependent membrane fatty acid and cell physiology changes in coccoid forms of Campylobacter jejuni. Appl Environ Microbiol 1995; 61: 2713–9.
24.Hobbie, JE, Daley, RJ, Jasper, S. The use of nucleopore filters for counting bacteria by fluorescence microscopy. Appl Environ Microbiol 1977; 33: 1225–8.
25.Ng, L-K, Sherburne, R, Taylor, DE, Stiles, ME. Morphological forms and viability of Campylobacter species studied by electron microscopy. J Bacteriol 1985; 164: 338–43.
26.Griffiths, PL. Morphological changes of Campylobacter jejuni growing in liquid culture. Lett Appl Microbiol 1993; 17: 152–5.
27.Humphrey, TJ. The influence of sub-lethal injury in Campylobacter jejuni on its subsequent resistence to antibiotics. J Appl Bacteriol 1984; 57: xvi.
28.Humprey, TJ. Techniques for the optimum recovery of cold injured Campylobacter jejuni from milk or water. J Appl Bacteriol 1986; 61: 125–32.
29.Penner, JL, Hennesey, JN. Passive haemagglutination technique for serotyping Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni on the basis of soluble heat stable antigens. J Clin Microbiol 1980; 12: 732–5.

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed