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Features of illnesses caused by five species of Campylobacter, Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) – 2010–2015

  • M. E. PATRICK (a1), O. L. HENAO (a1), T. ROBINSON (a2), A. L. GEISSLER (a1), A. CRONQUIST (a3), S. HANNA (a4), S. HURD (a5), F. MEDALLA (a1), J. PRUCKLER (a1) and B. E. MAHON (a1)...

Summary

The Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) conducts population-based surveillance for Campylobacter infection. For 2010 through 2015, we compared patients with Campylobacter jejuni with patients with infections caused by other Campylobacter species. Campylobacter coli patients were more often >40 years of age (OR = 1·4), Asian (OR = 2·3), or Black (OR = 1·7), and more likely to live in an urban area (OR = 1·2), report international travel (OR = 1·5), and have infection in autumn or winter (OR = 1·2). Campylobacter upsaliensis patients were more likely female (OR = 1·6), Hispanic (OR = 1·6), have a blood isolate (OR = 2·8), and have an infection in autumn or winter (OR = 1·7). Campylobacter lari patients were more likely to be >40 years of age (OR = 2·9) and have an infection in autumn or winter (OR = 1·7). Campylobacter fetus patients were more likely male (OR = 3·1), hospitalized (OR = 3·5), and have a blood isolate (OR = 44·1). International travel was associated with antimicrobial-resistant C. jejuni (OR = 12·5) and C. coli (OR = 12) infections. Species-level data are useful in understanding epidemiology, sources, and resistance of infections.

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Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Mary Patrick, MPH, Enteric Diseases Epidemiology Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road MS C-09, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. (Email: MEPatrick@cdc.gov)

References

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Keywords

Features of illnesses caused by five species of Campylobacter, Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) – 2010–2015

  • M. E. PATRICK (a1), O. L. HENAO (a1), T. ROBINSON (a2), A. L. GEISSLER (a1), A. CRONQUIST (a3), S. HANNA (a4), S. HURD (a5), F. MEDALLA (a1), J. PRUCKLER (a1) and B. E. MAHON (a1)...

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