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High infection rate of bank voles (Myodes glareolus) with Puumala virus is associated with a winter outbreak of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Croatia

  • A. TADIN (a1), L. BJEDOV (a2), J. MARGALETIC (a2), B. ZIBRAT (a1), L. CVETKO KRAJINOVIC (a1), P. SVOBODA (a1), I. C. KUROLT (a1), Z. STRITOF MAJETIC (a3), N. TURK (a3), O. DAKOVIC RODE (a1), R. CIVLJAK (a1), I. KUZMAN (a1) and A. MARKOTIC (a1)...

Summary

An outbreak of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) started on Medvednica mountain near Zagreb in January 2012. In order to detect the aetiological agent of the disease in small rodents and to make the link with the human outbreak, rodents were trapped at four different altitudes. Using nested RT–PCR, Puumala virus (PUUV) RNA was detected in 41/53 (77·4%) bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and Dobrava virus (DOBV) RNA was found in 6/61 (9·8%) yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis). Sequence analysis of a 341-nucleotide region of the PUUV S segment, obtained from all infected bank voles and five HFRS patients, showed 98·8–100% sequence similarity, indicating that the patients were probably exposed to PUUV on Medvednica mountain. A very large bank-vole population combined with an extremely high infection rate of PUUV was responsible for this unusual winter outbreak of HFRS in Croatia.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Mr A. Tadin, Mirogojska 8, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia. (Email: ante.tadin@bfm.hr)

References

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Keywords

High infection rate of bank voles (Myodes glareolus) with Puumala virus is associated with a winter outbreak of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Croatia

  • A. TADIN (a1), L. BJEDOV (a2), J. MARGALETIC (a2), B. ZIBRAT (a1), L. CVETKO KRAJINOVIC (a1), P. SVOBODA (a1), I. C. KUROLT (a1), Z. STRITOF MAJETIC (a3), N. TURK (a3), O. DAKOVIC RODE (a1), R. CIVLJAK (a1), I. KUZMAN (a1) and A. MARKOTIC (a1)...

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