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Human rhinovirus infections in hospitalized children: clinical, epidemiological and virological features

  • D. N. TRAN (a1) (a2) (a3), Q. D. TRINH (a3), N. T. K. PHAM (a3), T. M. H. PHAM (a2), M. T. HA (a4), T. Q. N. NGUYEN (a1) (a4), S. OKITSU (a1) (a3), H. SHIMIZU (a5), S. HAYAKAWA (a3), M. MIZUGUCHI (a1) and H. USHIJIMA (a1) (a3)...

Summary

Molecular epidemiology and clinical impact of human rhinovirus (HRV) are not well documented in tropical regions. This study compared the clinical characteristics of HRV to other common viral infections and investigated the molecular epidemiology of HRV in hospitalized children with acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in Vietnam. From April 2010 to May 2011, 1082 nasopharyngeal swabs were screened for respiratory viruses by PCR. VP4/VP2 sequences of HRV were further characterized. HRV was the most commonly detected virus (30%), in which 70% were diagnosed as either pneumonia or bronchiolitis. Children with single HRV infections presented with significantly higher rate of hypoxia than those infected with respiratory syncytial virus or parainfluenza virus (PIV)-3 (12·4% vs. 3·8% and 0%, respectively, P < 0·05), higher rate of chest retraction than PIV-1 (57·3% vs. 34·5%, P = 0·028), higher rate of wheezing than influenza A (63·2% vs. 42·3%, P = 0·038). HRV-C did not differ to HRV-A clinically. The genetic diversity and changes of types over time were observed and may explain the year-round circulation of HRV. One novel HRV-A type was discovered which circulated locally for several years. In conclusion, HRV showed high genetic diversity and was associated with significant morbidity and severe ARIs in hospitalized children.

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Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: H. Ushijima, MD, PhD, Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Nihon University, School of Medicine, 30-1 Oyaguchi-Kamicho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8610, Japan (Email: ushijima-hiroshi@jcom.home.ne.jp)

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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
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