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Humoral response of pregnant sows to foot and mouth disease vaccination

  • M. J. Francis (a1) and L. Black (a1)

Summary

Four groups of sows were inoculated, either once or twice, with O1BFS 1860 foot and mouth disease oil-emulsion vaccine during pregnancy and samples of serum. for analysis, were collected at intervals for > 300 days.

The pregnant sows responded well to vaccination regardless of their state of gestation. Single vaccination produced protective levels of antibody (> 1·53 log10SN50) in 3 out of 4 sows while double vaccination produced protective levels in all 6 sows tested. Anti-FMD IgM antibodies could be detected for 40–60 days after vaccination or revaccination. Anti-FMD IgG antibodies appeared within 10 days of vaccination and persisted, in each sow, for the duration of the study. The anti-FMD IgA response observed was less easy to characterize due to significant animal to animal variation. Although there was no evidence of a fall in the neutralizing antibody titres over one year post vaccination the anti-FMD IgG antibody population did show signs of a change in its heterogenity and avidity.

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Copyright

References

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