Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Increased colonization potential of Campylobacter jejuni strain 81116 after passage through chickens and its implication on the rate of transmission within flocks

  • S. A. Cawthraw (a1), T. M. Wassenaar (a2), R. Ayling (a1) and D. G. Newell (a1)

Summary

The mechanisms by which Campylobacter jejuni rapidly spreads through large broiler flocks are unknown. Recent evidence suggests that the minimum infective oral dose for 100% caecal colonization is about 104 cfu, which, with such a ‘fragile’ organism, may limit transmissibility. However, the colonization potential of laboratory-adapted strains may be anomalous compared with fresh isolates or those passaged in vivo. The colonization potential of two chicken and one human C. jejuni isolates, which were minimally passaged, have been investigated using a quantitative model of chicken colonization. There was no detectable difference between these strains but all were more efficient colonizers than a laboratory-adapted strain 81116. In addition, the colonization potential of C. jejuni strain 81116 following a passage in vivo was also determined. The results indicated this increased C. 10000 fold following a single passage in vivo, such that a dose of only 40 cfu caused maximal colonization. Enhanced colonization potential may, therefore, account for the rapid rate of transmission within large flocks.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Increased colonization potential of Campylobacter jejuni strain 81116 after passage through chickens and its implication on the rate of transmission within flocks
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Increased colonization potential of Campylobacter jejuni strain 81116 after passage through chickens and its implication on the rate of transmission within flocks
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Increased colonization potential of Campylobacter jejuni strain 81116 after passage through chickens and its implication on the rate of transmission within flocks
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence.

References

Hide All
1.Advisory Committee on the Microbiological Safety of Food. Interim report on campylobacter. London: HMSO, 1993.
2.Humphrey, TJ, Henley, A, Lanning, DG. The colonization of broiler chickens with Campylobacter jejuni: some epidemiological investigations. Epidemiol Infect 1993; 110: 601–7.
3.Evans, SJ. Introduction and spread of thermophilic campylobacters in broiler flocks. Vet Rec 1992; 131: 574–6.
4.Stern, NJ. Reservoirs for Campylobacter jejuni and approaches for intervention in poultry. In: Nachamkin, I, Blaser, MJ, Tomkins, LS, eds. Campylobacter jejuni, current status and future trends. Washington: ASM, 1992: 4960.
5.Wassenaar, TM, van der Zeijst, BAM, Ayling, R, Newell, DG. Colonization of chicks by motility mutants of Campylobacter jejuni demonstrates the importance of flagellin A expression. J. Gen Microbiol 1993; 139: 1171–5.
6.Sang, FC, Shane, SM, Yogasundram, K, Hagsted, HV, Kearnley, MT. Enhancement of Campylobacter jejuni virulence by serial passage in chicks. Avian Dis 1989; 33: 425–30.
7.Palmer, SR, Gully, PR, White, JM, et al. Water-borne outbreak of Campylobacter enteritis. Lancet 1983; i: 287–90.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed