Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-489z4 Total loading time: 0.37 Render date: 2022-05-28T19:37:29.824Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

The Infectious Intestinal Disease Study of England: A prospective evaluation of symptoms and health care use after an acute episode

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 June 2003

P. CUMBERLAND
Affiliation:
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
D. SETHI
Affiliation:
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
P. J. RODERICK
Affiliation:
University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
J. G. WHEELER
Affiliation:
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
J. M. COWDEN
Affiliation:
Scottish Centre for Infection and Environmental Health, Clifton Place, Glasgow G3 7W, UK
J. A. ROBERTS
Affiliation:
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
L. C. RODRIGUES
Affiliation:
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
M. J. HUDSON
Affiliation:
Centre for Applied Microbiology and Research, Porton, Wiltshire, UK
D. S. TOMPKINS
Affiliation:
Leeds Public Health Laboratory, Bridle Path, York Road, Leeds LS15 7TR, UK
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

The sequelae of Infectious Intestinal Disease (IID) in a population-based sample of cases and matched controls were investigated for a period of 3 months following the initial infection. Incident cases of IID presenting to GPs or occurring in the community and controls were studied at 3 weeks and over a 3-month follow-up period. Cases were six times more likely than controls to have gastrointestinal symptoms, particularly diarrhoea, at 3 weeks. Ten per cent of cases consulted their GP in the 3 months after episode and 2·3% were referred to hospital. GP presentation rates were twice as high in cases. Gastrointestinal symptoms persist after IID, leading to an increased likelihood of GP consultation and hospital referral. Diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome may be more likely following IID. The burden of IID is likely to be considerable given its high incidence and the frequency of such sequelae.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2003 Cambridge University Press
You have Access
27
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Infectious Intestinal Disease Study of England: A prospective evaluation of symptoms and health care use after an acute episode
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The Infectious Intestinal Disease Study of England: A prospective evaluation of symptoms and health care use after an acute episode
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The Infectious Intestinal Disease Study of England: A prospective evaluation of symptoms and health care use after an acute episode
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *