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Introduction to this issue: Dealing with TB in wildlife

  • C. GORTAZAR (a1) and P. COWAN (a2)
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References

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7.Ong, B, et al. Tuberculosis in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in Peninsular Malaysia. Epidemiology and Infection. Published online: 18 February 2013. doi:10.1017/S0950268813000265.
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10.Hone, J. Diminishing returns in bovine tuberculosis (TB) control. Epidemiology and Infection 2013. doi:10.1017/S0950268813000927.
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14.Caley, P. Bovine tuberculosis in brushtail possums: models, dogma and data. New Zealand Journal of Ecology 2006; 30: 2534.
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16.Nugent, G. Maintenance, spillover and spillback transmission of bovine tuberculosis in multi-host wildlife complexes: a New Zealand case study. Veterinary Microbiology 2011; 151: 3442.
17.Barron, MC, Nugent, G, Cross, ML. Importance and mitigation of the risk of spillback transmission of Mycobacterium bovis infection for eradication of bovine tuberculosis from wildlife in New Zealand. Epidemiology and Infection 2012. Published online: 5 December 2012. doi:10.1017/S0950268812002683.
18.Yockney, I, et al. Comparison of ranging behaviour in a multi-species complex of free-ranging hosts of bovine tuberculosis in relation to their use as disease sentinels. Epidemiology and Infection. Published online: 6 March 2013. doi:10.1017/S0950268813000289.
19.Nugent, G, et al. Bait aggregation to reduce cost and toxin use in aerial 1080 baiting of small mammal pests in New Zealand. Pest Management Science 2012; 68: 13741379.
20.Nugent, G, et al. Effect of prefeeding, sowing rate and sowing pattern on efficacy of aerial 1080 poisoning of small-mammal pests in New Zealand. Wildlife Research 2011; 38: 249259.
21.Ogilvie, SC, et al. Improving techniques for the Waxtag possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) monitoring index. New Zealand Plant Protection 2006; 59: 2833.
22.Sweetapple, P, Nugent, G. Chew-track-cards: a multiple species small mammal detection device. New Zealand Journal of Ecology 2011; 35: 153162.
23.Bosson, MAJ, et al. Proving freedom in a disease with multiple host species: an area case study for TB control in New Zealand. Epidémiologie et Santé Animale 2011; 59–60: 9597.
24.Anderson, DP, et al. A novel approach to assess the probability of disease eradication from a wild-animal reservoir host. Epidemiology and Infection. Published online: 23 January 2013. doi:10.1017/S095026881200310X.
25.Walter, D, et al. Surveillance and movements of Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) in the bovine tuberculosis region of Michigan. Epidemiology and Infection. Published online: 26 March 2013. doi:10.1017/S0950268813000629.
26.Boadella, M, et al. Six recommendations for improving monitoring of diseases shared with wildlife: Examples regarding mycobacterial infections in Spain. European Journal of Wildlife Research 2011; 57: 697706.
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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
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