Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Is Rotavirus contributing to an increase of diarrhoea in a region of Spain?

  • L. GERSTEL (a1) (a2), M. P. RODRIGO (a3), B. ADIEGO (a3), F. J. LUQUERO (a2), M. J. REVILLO (a4), F. J. CASTILLO (a5), A. BARRASA (a1) and M. VALENCIANO (a2)...

Summary

Diarrhoeal illnesses are the most frequent of notifiable diseases in Aragon. Physicians notify diarrhoea cases with presumed infectious origin on a weekly basis. Following an increase in 2005–2006, we aimed to identify the responsible organism(s) in order to inform control measures. We described seasonality of diarrhoea notifications for 1998–2004 and 2005–2006. We calculated correlations between diarrhoea notifications and enteric pathogens diagnosed in two Aragonese laboratories, and applied linear regression using coefficients of determination (r2). In 2005–2006 the winter peak of diarrhoea notifications increased from 2494 to 3357 weekly cases (34·6%) and the peak in Rotavirus diagnoses from 15 to 39 weekly cases. The correlation of diarrhoea notifications with Rotavirus was 0·05 in 1998–2004 and 0·42 in 2005–2006. The model for 1998–2004 included Salmonella enterica, Giardia lamblia and Clostridium difficile (r2=0·08) and for 2005–2006 Rotavirus and Astrovirus (r2=0·24). Our results suggest that Rotavirus contributed to the increase of diarrhoea notifications. We recommend determining the disease burden of Rotavirus in order to guide vaccination policies.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Is Rotavirus contributing to an increase of diarrhoea in a region of Spain?
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Is Rotavirus contributing to an increase of diarrhoea in a region of Spain?
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Is Rotavirus contributing to an increase of diarrhoea in a region of Spain?
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: L. Gerstel, M.D., van Poelgeestlaan 49, 2352TA Leiderdorp, The Netherlands. (Email: lisannegerstel@gmail.com)

References

Hide All
1. Kosek, M, Bern, C, Guerrant, RL. The global burden of diarrhoeal disease, as estimated from studies published between 1992 and 2000. Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2003; 81: 197204.
2. Gil, A, et al. Burden of hospitalizations attributable to rotavirus infection in children in Spain, period 1999–2000. Vaccine 2004; 22: 22212225.
3. Gil, A, et al. Burden of hospitalizations attributable to rotavirus infection in children in the autonomous region of Madrid, Spain, period 1999–2000. Anales de Pediatria (Barcelona, Spain: 2003) 2006; 64: 530535.
4. Luquero Alcalde, FJ, et al. Gastroenteritis by rotavirus in Spanish children. Analysis of the disease burden. European Journal of Pediatrics 2007; 25. Published online: 25 July 2007. doi:10.1007/s00431-007-0550-8.
5. Instituto Nacional de Estadistica Database (INEBase) (http://www.ine.es/inebmenu/indice.htm). Accessed 2 June 2007.
6. Sobrino, L, Soler, P. Epidemiological surveillance of Rotavirus infection. Microbiological Information System. Period 2005–2006 [in Spanish]. Boletin Epidemiologico Semanal 2006; 14: 157158.
7. Visser, LE, et al. Impact of rotavirus disease in Spain: an estimate of hospital admissions due to rotavirus. Acta Paediatrica (Suppl.) 1999; 88: 7276.
8. van den Wijngaard, C, et al. Validation of syndromic suveillance for respiratory pathogen activity. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2008; 14: 917925.
9. Sanchez-Fauquier, A, et al. Surveillance of human calicivirus in Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2005; 11: 13271329.
10. Boga, JA, et al. Etiology of sporadic cases of pediatric acute gastroenteritis in Asturias, Spain, and genotyping and characterization of norovirus strains involved. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2004; 42: 26682674.
11. Lopman, BA, et al. A summertime peak of ‘winter vomiting disease’: surveillance of noroviruses in England and Wales, 1995 to 2002. BMC Public Health 2003; 3: 13.
12. Government of Aragon, Department of Health and Consumption. Surveillance of other diarrhoeal processes in Aragon. Web of sentinel doctors of Aragon. Week 31/2007 [in Spanish].
13. Henning, KJ. What is syndromic surveillance? Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2004; 53 (Suppl): 511.
14. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Injury and illness surveillance in hospitals and acute-care facilities after hurricanes Katrina and Rita – New Orleans area, Louisiana, September 25–October 15, 2005. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2006; 55: 3538.
15. Panagiotakos, DB, Costarelli, V, Polychronopoulos, E. The perspective of syndromic surveillance systems on public health threats: a paradigm of the Athens 2004 Olympic Games. Journal of the Royal Society of Health 2007; 127: 111112.
16. Rockx, B, et al. Syndromic surveillance in the Netherlands for the early detection of West Nile virus epidemics. Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases 2006; 6: 161169.
17. Balter, S, et al. Three years of emergency department gastrointestinal syndromic surveillance in New York City: what have we found? Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2005; 54 (Suppl.): 175180.
18. Luquero, F, et al. Rotavirus in Spain (2000–2004): a predictive model for a surveillance system. Eurosurveillance 2007; 12 (2), 686 (http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=686).
19. Bernaola, IE, et al. Vaccination schedule of the spanish association of pediatrics: recommendations 2007. Anales de pediatria (Barcelona, Spain: 2003) 2007; 66: 6269.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed