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Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in combat support hospitals in three regions of Iraq

  • X.-Z. HUANG (a1), D. M. CASH (a1), M. A. CHAHINE (a1), G. T. VAN HORN (a2), D. P. ERWIN (a2), J. T. McKAY (a2), L. R. HAMILTON (a2), K. H. JERKE (a3), E.-M. A. CO (a2), W. K. ALDOUS (a2), E. P. LESHO (a1), L. E. LINDLER (a4), R. A. BOWDEN (a1) and M. P. NIKOLICH (a1)...

Summary

Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of infections in deployed service members. Based on a molecular epidemiological study of 182 MRSA isolates from patients in three U.S. Army combat support hospitals in separate regions in Iraq, USA300 clone was the most predominant (80%) pulsotype. This finding suggested that strain carriage from the home country by military personnel is epidemiologically more important than local acquisition.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr X.-Z. Huang, Division of Bacterial and Rickettsial Diseases, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, 503 Robert Grant Ave, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA. (Email: xiaozhe.huang@amedd.army.mil)

References

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1.Calhoun, JH, et al. Multidrug-resistant organisms in military wounds from Iraq and Afghanistan. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 2008; 466: 13561362.
2.Huang, X-Z, et al. Molecular characteristics of multidrug resistant bacteria isolated in the Iraq theater. In: Presentation Abstract of the 47th Annual Meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Philadelphia, PA: Infectious Diseases Society of America, October 2009, Session 104.
3.Johnson, JK, et al. Skin and soft tissue infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 clone. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2007; 13: 11951200.
4.Davis, SL, et al. Epidemiology and outcomes of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2007; 45: 17051711.
5.Vandenesch, F, et al. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes: worldwide emergence. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2003; 9: 978984.
6.Milheirico, C, et al. Update to the multiplex PCR strategy for assignment of mec element types in Staphylococcus aureus. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 2007; 51: 33743377.
7.Lina, G, et al. Involvement of Panton-Valentine leukocidin-producing Staphylococcus aureus in primary skin infections and pneumonia. Clinical Infectious Diseases 1999; 29: 11281132.
8.McDougal, LK, et al. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from the United States: establishing a national database. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2003; 41: 51135120.
9.Tietz, A, et al. Transatlantic spread of the USA300 clone of MRSA. New England Journal of Medicine 2005; 353: 532533.
10.Reyes, J, et al. Dissemination of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 sequence type 8 lineage in Latin America. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2009; 49: 18611867.
11.Ellis, MW, et al. Presence and molecular epidemiology of virulence factors in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains colonizing and infecting soldiers. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2009; 47: 940945.
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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
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