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Modelling the hepatitis B vaccination programme in prisons

  • A. J. SUTTON (a1) (a2), N. J. GAY (a1), W. J. EDMUNDS (a1), N. J. ANDREWS (a1), V. D. HOPE (a3) (a4), R. L. GILBERT (a2), M. PIPER (a5) and O. N. GILL (a2)...
Abstract

A vaccination programme offering hepatitis B (HBV) vaccine at reception into prison has been introduced into selected prisons in England and Wales. Over the coming years it is anticipated this vaccination programme will be extended. A model has been developed to assess the potential impact of the programme on the vaccination coverage of prisoners, ex-prisoners, and injecting drug users (IDUs). Under a range of coverage scenarios, the model predicts the change over time in the vaccination status of new entrants to prison, current prisoners and IDUs in the community. The model predicts that at baseline in 2012 57% of the IDU population will be vaccinated with up to 72% being vaccinated depending on the vaccination scenario implemented. These results are sensitive to the size of the IDU population in England and Wales and the average time served by an IDU during each prison visit. IDUs that do not receive HBV vaccine in the community are at increased risk from HBV infection. The HBV vaccination programme in prisons is an effective way of vaccinating this hard-to-reach population although vaccination coverage on prison reception must be increased to achieve this.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Health Protection Agency, Modelling and Economics Unit, 61 Colindale Avenue, Colindale, London, NW9 5EQ, UK. (Email: Andrew.Sutton@hpa.org.uk)
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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
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