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Modelling the transmission of airborne infections in enclosed spaces

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 February 2006

C. J. NOAKES
Affiliation:
Aerobiological Research Group, School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
C. B. BEGGS
Affiliation:
Medical Engineering Group, School of Engineering, Design & Technology, University of Bradford,Bradford, UK
P. A. SLEIGH
Affiliation:
Aerobiological Research Group, School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
K. G. KERR
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust, Harrogate District Hospital, Harrogate, UK
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Abstract

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The Wells–Riley equation for modelling airborne infection in indoor environments is incorporated into an SEIR epidemic model with a short incubation period to simulate the transmission dynamics of airborne infectious diseases in ventilated rooms. The model enables the effect of environmental factors such as the ventilation rate and the room occupancy to be examined, and allows the long-term impact of infection control measures to be assessed. A theoretical parametric study is carried out to demonstrate how changes to both the physical environment and infection control procedures may potentially limit the spread of short-incubation-period airborne infections in indoor environments such as hospitals.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
2006 Cambridge University Press
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