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Molecular analysis of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from US service members wounded in Iraq, 2003–2008

  • X.-Z. HUANG (a1), M. A. CHAHINE (a1), J. G. FRYE (a2), D. M. CASH (a1), E. P. LESHO (a1), D. W. CRAFT (a1), L. E. LINDLER (a3) and M. P. NIKOLICH (a1)...
Summary

Global dissemination of imipenem-resistant (IR) clones of Acinetobacter baumanniiA. calcoaceticus complex (ABC) have been frequently reported but the molecular epidemiological features of IR-ABC in military treatment facilities (MTFs) have not been described. We characterized 46 IR-ABC strains from a dataset of 298 ABC isolates collected from US service members hospitalized in different US MTFs domestically and overseas during 2003–2008. All IR strains carried the blaOXA-51 gene and 40 also carried blaOXA-23 on plasmids and/or chromosome; one carried blaOXA-58 and four contained ISAbal located upstream of blaOXA-51. Strains tended to cluster by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles in time and location. Strains from two major clusters were identified as international clone I by multilocus sequence typing.

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The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence . The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence: Dr X.-Z. Huang, Division of Bacterial and Rickettsial Diseases, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, 503 Robert Grant Ave, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA. (Email: xiaozhe.huang1.ctr@us.army.mil)
References
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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
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