Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Review and critical discussion of assumptions and modelling options to study the spread of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) within a cattle herd

  • A.-F. VIET (a1), C. FOURICHON (a1) and H. SEEGERS (a1)

Summary

Relevance of epidemiological models depends on assumptions on the population structure and dynamics, on the biology of the host–parasite interaction, and on mathematical modelling. In this paper we reviewed published models of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) spread within a herd. Modelling options and assumptions on herd dynamics and BVDV transmission were discussed. A cattle herd is a population with a controlled size. Animals are separated into subgroups according to their age or their physiological status inducing heterogeneity of horizontal transmission. Complexity of models results from: (1) horizontal and vertical virus transmission, (2) birth of persistently infected animals, (3) excretion by transiently and persistently infected animals. Areas where there was a lack of knowledge were identified. Assumptions on the force of infection used to model the horizontal virus transmission were presented and discussed. We proposed possible ways of improving models (e.g. force of infection, validation) and essential model features for further BVDV models.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Review and critical discussion of assumptions and modelling options to study the spread of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) within a cattle herd
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Review and critical discussion of assumptions and modelling options to study the spread of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) within a cattle herd
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Review and critical discussion of assumptions and modelling options to study the spread of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) within a cattle herd
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: A.-F. Viet, Unit of Animal Health Management, Veterinary School – INRA, BP 40706, 44307 Nantes Cedex 03, France. (Email: af.viet@vet-nantes.fr)

References

Hide All
1. Anderson, RM, May, RM. Infectious Diseases of Humans: dynamics and control. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991, pp. 757.
2. Diekmann, O, Heesterbeek, JAP. Mathematical epidemiology of infectious diseases: model building, analysis and interpretation. New York: Wiley, 2000, pp. 303.
3. Andersson, H, Britton, T. Stochastic epidemic models and their statistical analysis. Lecture Notes in Statistics 151, NewYork: Springer-Verlag, 2000, pp. 137.
4. Daley, DJ, Gani, J. Epidemic Modelling: an introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999, pp. 213.
5. Radostits, OM, Littlejohns, IR. New concepts in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and control of diseases caused by the bovine viral diarrhea virus. Canadian Veterinary Journal 1988; 29: 513528.
6. McGowan, MR, et al. Increased reproductive losses in cattle infected with pestivirus around the time of insemination. Veterinary Record 1993; 133: 3943.
7. Houe, H. Epidemiology of bovine viral diarrhea virus. Veterinary Clinics of North America – Food Animal Practice 1995; 11: 521547.
8. Houe, H. Epidemiological features and economical importance of bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infections. Veterinary Microbiology 1999; 64: 89107.
9. De Jong, MCM, Diekmann, O, Heesterbeek, H. How does transmission of infection depend on population size? In: Mollison, D ed. Epidemic Models: their structure and relation to data. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995, pp. 8494.
10. McCallum, H, Barlow, N, Hone, J. How should pathogen transmission be modelled? Trends in Ecology & Evolution 2001; 16: 295300.
11. Hartley, PE, Richards, MS. A study of the transmission of Bovine Virus Diarrhoea Virus between and within cattle herds. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica 1988; 84 (Suppl.): 164166.
12. Houe, H, Pedersen, KM, Meyling, A. A computerized spread sheet model for calculating total annual national losses due to bovine viral-diarrhoea virus infection in dairy herds and sensitivity analysis of selected parameters. In: Proceedings of the 2nd Symposium on Pestiviruses, 1992, pp. 179184.
13. Bennett, R. Modelling the costs associated with BVD in dairy herds. Cattle Practice 2000; 8: 1516.
14. Stott, AW, et al. A linear programming approach to estimate the economic impact of bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) at the whole-farm level in Scotland. Preventive Veterinary Medicine 2003; 59: 5166.
15. Moerman, A, et al. A long term epidemiological study of bovine viral diarrhoea infections in a large herd of dairy cattle. Veterinary Record 1993; 132: 622626.
16. Innocent, G, et al. The use of mass-action model to validate the output from a stochastic simulation model of bovine viral diarrhoea virus spread in a closed dairy herd. Preventive Veterinary Medicine 1997; 31: 199209.
17. Innocent, G, et al. A computer simulation of the transmission dynamics and the effects of duration of immunity and survival of persistently infected animals on the spread of bovine viral-diarrhoea virus in dairy cattle. Epidemiology and Infection 1997; 119: 91100.
18. Humphry, RW, Stott, AW, Gunn, GJ. Modelling BVD at herd level compared with individual animal level. Preventive Veterinary Medicine 2005; 72: 169175.
19. Gunn, GJ, Stott, AW, Humphry, RW. Modelling and costing BVD outbreaks in beef herds. Veterinary Journal 2004; 167: 143149.
20. Pasman, EJ, Dijkhuizen, AA, Wentink, GH. A state-transition model to simulate the economics of bovine virus diarrhoea control. Preventive Veterinary Medicine 1994; 20: 269277.
21. Sørensen, JT, Enevoldsen, C, Houe, H. A stochastic model for simulation of the economic consequences of bovine virus diarrhoea virus infection in a dairy herd. Preventive Veterinary Medicine 1995; 23: 215227.
22. Cherry, BR, Reeves, MJ, Smith, G. Evaluation of bovine viral diarrhea virus control using a mathematical model of infection dynamics. Preventive Veterinary Medicine 1998; 33: 91108.
23. Viet, A-F, et al. A model of the spread of the bovine viral-diarrhoea virus within a dairy herd. Preventive Veterinary Medicine 2004; 63: 211236.
24. Hurd, HS, Kaneene, JB. The application of simulation models and systems analysis in epidemiology: a review. Preventive Veterinary Medicine 1993; 15: 8199.
25. Coria, MF, McClurkin, AW. Duration of active and colostrum-derived passive antibodies to bovine viral diarrhea virus in calves. Canadian Journal of Comparative Medicine 1978; 42: 239243.
26. Menanteau-Horta, AM, et al. Effect of maternal antibody upon vaccination with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and bovine virus diarrhea vaccines. Canadian Journal of Comparative Medicine 1985; 49: 1014.
27. Palfi, H, Houe, H, Philipsen, J. Studies on the decline of Bovine Virus Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) maternal antibodies and detectability of BVDV in persistently infected calves. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica 1993; 34: 105107.
28. Duffell, SJ, Harkness, JW. Bovine virus diarrhoea-mucosal disease infection in cattle. Veterinary Record 1985; 117: 240245.
29. Kendrick, JW, Franti, CE. Bovine viral diarrhea: decay of colostrum-conferred antibody in the calf. American Journal of Veterinary Research 1974; 35: 589592.
30. Lang-Ree, JR, et al. Transmission of bovine viral diarrhoea virus by rectal examination. Veterinary Record 1994; 135: 412413.
31. Niskanen, R, Lindberg, A. Transmission of bovine viral diarrhoea virus by unhygienic vaccination procedures, ambient air, and from contaminated pens. Veterinary Journal 2003; 165: 125130.
32. Kendrick, JW. Bovine viral diarrhea-mucosal disease virus infection in pregnant cows. American Journal of Veterinary Research 1971; 32: 533544.
33. Done, JT, et al. Bovine virus diarrhoea-mucosal disease virus: pathogenicity for the fetal calf following maternal infection. Veterinary Record 1980; 106: 473479.
34. Grahn, TC, Fahning, ML, Zemjanis, R. Nature of early reproductive failure caused by bovine viral diarrhea virus. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 1984; 185: 429432.
35. McClurkin, AW, et al. Production of cattle immunotolerant to Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus. Canadian Journal of Comparative Medicine 1984; 48: 156161.
36. Rüfenacht, J, et al. The effect of infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus on the fertility of Swiss dairy cattle. Theriogenology 2001; 56: 199210.
37. Taylor, LF, Danzen, ED, van Donkersgoed, J. Losses over a 2-year period associated with fetal infection with the bovine viral diarrhea virus in a beef cow-calf herd in Saskatchewan. Canadian Veterinary Journal 1997; 38: 2328.
38. Viet, A-F, et al. Influence of the herd structure according to subgroups on the spread of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) within a dairy herd. Revue de Médecine Vétérinaire 2004; 155: 132140.
39. Harkness, JW, The control of bovine viral diarrhoea virus infection. Annales de Recherche Vétérinaire 1987; 18: 167174.
40. Kleijnen, JPC. Verification and validation of simulation models. European Journal of Operational Research 1995; 82: 145162.
41. De Jong, MCM. Mathematical modelling in veterinary epidemiology: why model building is important. Preventive Veterinary Medicine 1995; 25: 183193.
42. Allen, LJS, Burgin, AM. Comparison of deterministic and stochastic SIS and SIR models in discrete time. Mathematical Biosciences 2000; 163: 133.
43. Becker, NG, Britton, T. Statistical studies of infectious disease incidence. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society series B – Statistical Methodology 1999; 61: 287307.
44. O'Neill, PD, Roberts, GO. Bayesian inference for partially observed stochastic epidemics. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A – Statistics in Society 1999; 162: 121129.
45. Viet, A-F, et al. Approach for qualitative validation using aggregated data for a stochastic simulation model of the spread of the Bovine Viral-Diarrhoea Virus in a dairy cattle herd. Acta Biotheoretica 2006; 54: 207217.
46. Grimm, V. Ten years of individual-based modelling in ecology: what have we learned and what could we learn in the future? Ecological Modelling 1999; 115: 129148.

Review and critical discussion of assumptions and modelling options to study the spread of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) within a cattle herd

  • A.-F. VIET (a1), C. FOURICHON (a1) and H. SEEGERS (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed