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Salmonellosis associated with mass catering: a survey of European Union cases over a 15-year period

  • A. OSIMANI (a1), L. AQUILANTI (a1) and F. CLEMENTI (a1)

Summary

Salmonella spp. is the causative agent of a foodborne disease called salmonellosis, which is the second most commonly reported gastrointestinal infection in the European Union (EU). Although over the years the annual number of cases of foodborne salmonellosis within the EU has decreased markedly, in 2014, a total of 88 715 confirmed cases were still reported by 28 EU Member States. The European Food Safety Authority reported that, after the household environment, the most frequent settings for the transmission of infection were catering services. As evidenced by the reviewed literature, which was published over the last 15 years (2000–2014), the most frequently reported causative agents were Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium serovars. These studies on outbreaks indicated the involvement of various facilities, including hospital restaurants, takeaways, ethnic restaurants, hotels, in-flight catering, one fast-food outlet and the restaurant of an amusement park. The most commonly reported sources of infection were eggs and/or egg-containing foods, followed by meat- and vegetable-based preparations. Epidemiological and microbiological studies allowed common risk factors to be identified, including the occurrence of cross-contamination between heat-treated foods and raw materials or improperly cleaned food-contact surfaces.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Professor F. Clementi, Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari ed Ambientali, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 AnconaItaly (Email: f.clementi@univpm.it)

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Salmonellosis associated with mass catering: a survey of European Union cases over a 15-year period

  • A. OSIMANI (a1), L. AQUILANTI (a1) and F. CLEMENTI (a1)

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