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Seasonality of Campylobacter jejuni isolates associated with human campylobacteriosis in the Manawatu region, New Zealand

  • A. FRIEDRICH (a1) (a2), J. C. MARSHALL (a1), P. J. BIGGS (a1) (a2), A. C. MIDWINTER (a1) and N. P. FRENCH (a1) (a2)...
Summary

A 9-year time-series of genotyped human campylobacteriosis cases from the Manawatu region of New Zealand was used to investigate strain-type seasonality. The data were collected from 2005 to 2013 and the samples were multi-locus sequence-typed (MLST). The four most prevalent clonal complexes (CCs), consisting of 1215 isolates, were CC48, CC21, CC45 and CC61. Seasonal decomposition and Poisson regression with autocorrelated errors, were used to display and test for seasonality of the most prevalent CCs. Of the four examined CCs, only CC45 showed a marked seasonal (summer) peak. The association of CC45 with summer peaks has been observed in other temperate countries, but has previously not been identified in New Zealand. This is the first in-depth study over a long time period employing MLST data to examine strain-type-associated seasonal patterns of C. jejuni infection in New Zealand.

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Corresponding author
* Author for correspondence: Miss A. Friedrich, PhD, Institut für Biotechnologie, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 18, 1190 Vienna, Austria. (Email: friedrich.anja@hotmail.de)
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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
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