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Seroconversion for cytomegalovirus infection in a cohort of pregnant women in Québec, 2010–2013

  • V. LAMARRE (a1), N. L. GILBERT (a2) (a3), C. ROUSSEAU (a1) (a4), T. W. GYORKOS (a5) (a6) and W. D. FRASER (a7)...
Summary

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the leading cause of congenital infection and non-genetic sensorineural hearing loss in children. There are no recent data on the incidence of CMV infection during pregnancy in Canada. This present study was undertaken to determine the seroprevalence of CMV IgG antibodies and the rate of seroconversion in a cohort of pregnant women in the province of Québec, Canada. We used serum samples and questionnaire data collected as part of the 3D Pregnancy and Birth Cohort Study (2010–2013) conducted in Québec, Canada. CMV IgG antibodies were determined in serum samples collected at the first and third trimesters. Associations between independent variables and seroprevalence were assessed using logistic regression, and associations with seroconversions, by Poisson regression. Of 1938 pregnant women tested, 40·4% were seropositive for CMV at baseline. Previous CMV infection was associated with: working as a daycare educator, lower education, lower income, having had children, first language other than French or English, and being born outside Canada or the United States. Of the 1122 initially seronegative women, 24 (2·1%) seroconverted between their first and third trimesters. The seroconversion rate was 1·4 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·9–2·1]/10 000 person-days at risk or 3·9 (95% CI 2·5–5·9)/100 pregnancies (assuming a 280-day gestation). The high proportion of pregnant women susceptible to CMV infection (nearly 60%) and the subsequent rate of seroconversion are of concern.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence: Dr V. Lamarre, Infectious Diseases Division, Department of Pediatrics, CHU Sainte-Justine, 3175 Chemin de la Côte-Sainte-Catherine, Montreal, QC, Canada, H3 T 1C4, Canada. (Email: valerie_lamarre@ssss.gouv.qc.ca)
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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
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