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Suspected zoonotic transmission of rotavirus group A in Danish adults

  • S. E. MIDGLEY (a1), C. K. HJULSAGER (a2), L. E. LARSEN (a2), G. FALKENHORST (a3) and B. BÖTTIGER (a1)...

Summary

Group A rotaviruses infect humans and a variety of animals. In July 2006 a rare rotavirus strain with G8P[14] specificity was identified in the stool samples of two adult patients with diarrheoa, who lived in the same geographical area in Denmark. Nucleotide sequences of the VP7, VP4, VP6, and NSP4 genes of the identified strains were identical. Phylogenetic analyses showed that both Danish G8P[14] strains clustered with rotaviruses of animal, mainly, bovine and caprine, origin. The high genetic relatedness to animal rotaviruses and the atypical epidemiological features suggest that these human G8P[14] strains were acquired through direct zoonotic transmission events.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: B. Böttiger, M.D., Department of Virology, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. (Email: bbo@ssi.dk)

References

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