Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Sustained high levels of stored drinking water treatment and retention of hand-washing knowledge in rural Kenyan households following a clinic-based intervention

  • A. A. PARKER (a1) (a2), R. STEPHENSON (a1), P. L. RILEY (a3), S. OMBEKI (a4), C. KOMOLLEH (a4), L. SIBLEY (a2) and R. QUICK (a1) (a5)...

Abstract

Nyanza Province, Kenya is characterized by poor water quality and high diarrhoea prevalence. To address these problems, nurses in a maternal and child health clinic in Homa Bay, Kenya were trained in household water chlorination with a locally available, social marketed product, and in six steps of proper hand washing. They were asked to communicate this information to their clients. Interviews immediately following the training by nurses were conducted on 220 clients, of whom 168 (76%) reported being taught both procedures during their clinic visit. After 2 weeks, free chlorine residuals were present in stored drinking water in 67 out of 98 (68%) clients' homes and, 1 year later, in 36 out of 51 (71%) clients' homes. After 2 weeks, all six hand-washing steps were correctly demonstrated by 41 (44%) out of 93 clients, and by 17 out of 51 (34%) 1 year later. This brief, practical intervention shows promise for vulnerable populations.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Sustained high levels of stored drinking water treatment and retention of hand-washing knowledge in rural Kenyan households following a clinic-based intervention
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Sustained high levels of stored drinking water treatment and retention of hand-washing knowledge in rural Kenyan households following a clinic-based intervention
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Sustained high levels of stored drinking water treatment and retention of hand-washing knowledge in rural Kenyan households following a clinic-based intervention
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

National Immunization Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd, Mail Stop E-61, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. (Email: amyaparker@gmail.com)
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed